Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form?
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Topic: Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form?

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    Default Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form?

    For my script basically, a character who you think is good, and think is the main character's ally, turns out to be bad all along.

    But when my friends read it, they were completely out to lunch and lost and cannot figure out why the ally was bad, or what was motivating her to do this the whole time.

    I cannot really write what the characters are thinking and write their motives. All I can write is what the audience will see.

    The fake ally villain has no real reason to tell the MC her motives, as she doesn't want the MC to know everything, and she has no reason to discuss her motives with anyone, since she's committing crimes and doesn't want anyone to know.

    So if that's the case, how do you make the audience understand a twist, after it happens, since they cannot read her mind, and she has no reason to tell any of other characters? She has reason to discuss her involvement with one other character, but that time has passed long ago in the story.

    I was thinking of maybe after the twist is revealed where she does something that says she's a villain, she could have flashbacks to explain things.

    However, flashbacks mean I would have to shoot more scenes, get more locations, more money, etc. So I was wondering if a voice over flashback would be considered bad form, or cheesy?

    Basically movies are visual mediums overall, but what if after she revealed herself to be a villain, she then had flashbacks where you just hear her having a conversation with another character, who would be her co-conspirator? However, that co-conspirator, was only in one scene before, so the audience would have to remember that voice from about 45 minutes ago. So would a voice over flashback work?

    Also how would one write a flashback if it's just a voiceover? I couldn't find any screenwriting site that talks about that cause every example, is always a visual scene change. Like if a character has a flashback and it's just a voice over of her talking to someone, would it be formatted like this?

    GINA (V.O.) (FLASHBACK)

    The only movie I can think of that used the voice over flashback method was The Usual Suspects at the end. So I looked up the script for the movie online, but the script does not have a voice over flashback in it.

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    Last edited by ironpony; 01-16-2018 at 04:39 PM.

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    Anyone?


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    Super Moderator   Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form? Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form? Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form? Do you think voice over flasbacks are considered bad form? mara's Avatar
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    I don't understand the question - are you asking if the main character can simply explain what happened?

    The Usual Suspects used voice over on top of clips that the audience had already seen but not focused on.

    Like most things, it depends on good writing.

    Screenwriter and script consultant: www.maralesemann.com

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