Does this count as a plot hole in my script?
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Topic: Does this count as a plot hole in my script?

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    Default Does this count as a plot hole in my script?

    Basically for my script, which is a thriller set in modern times, a gang of villains are recruiting a new member, and they give him a 'blood in', which is a term used for when a gang tests a new recruit, by having him/her spill the blood of another person, or at least see if they will do it.

    The gang in my story, wants to make sure that the new recruit is not be an undercover cop. So they put him through the blood in, but they do not want to put the man in a situation where he has to harm a real hostage. The reason is, is because if he is an undercover cop, and there could be other cops nearby, they would be up on kidnapping related charges, if they had a real hostage for the new recruit to harm.

    So the gang decides to use one of it's own members, posing as a hostage, for the new recruit to pull the trigger on. But the gun will not be loaded. It will be loaded with a dummy round, that won't fire, in case the new recruit is an undercover cop. That way, if he is, and he tries to bust the gang, the hostage, will not testify against them, if she is rescued.

    During the blood in test though, a real cop is patrolling the streets, and he gets a glimpse of two of the gang members search the new recruit for weapons and a wire. He sees that the new recruits are hiding their faces with sunglasses and hats, as well, to hide their faces from the new recruit.

    After seeing that the new recruit is clean, the gang takes him to the place where they are holding one of their own members, who is posing as a hostage for the new recruit.

    The cop follows them, sneaks around to see what is going on, and spots the blood in, in progress. He stops it and manages to arrest one of the gang members, and rescue the fake hostage, thinking she is real. The other gang members as well as the new recruit, escape as the cop rescues her and arrests the one.

    Now the fake hostage and the one gang member who was caught, now have to come up with some sort of alibi to get out of the situation. They have to come up with a lie to make it appear to the court that they are two innocent people and that no crime happened. They can say that they were roleplaying, and that no one was actually going to shoot anyone, and it was all acting among themselves.

    The woman does not tell the police it was all roleplaying right when the find her, because she doesn't know what the police know, and doesn't know which of the gang members were arrested, and has to wait till the others get away, before she can make up a story.

    She has to stay silent until she finds out who gets away, cause if she says it was all roleplaying, the police will want to know the names of the others and she doesn't want to give up their identities, since they are related to other crimes from the past, and they do not want to be put on the police's radar for anything.

    Another reason why she remains silent, is because if she says it was not a kidnapping, but at the same time, lies about who they are, since she doesn't want to reveal their true identities, any lies she tells can legally be used against her, if the police find out she is lying, or spots holes in the lies. So if she stays silent, she will not give them anything they can use against her.

    So she stays silent to not have to reveal the names of the others, and just acts like an uncooperative victim, saying she doesn't want to get involved in the case at all. Now I wrote it so that without her cooperating and not giving a statement to the police, that the police are unable to prove that there was a kidnap victim at all, since she basically says she doesn't want to get involved, and just takes off, with the police not being able to do much about it.

    So I wrote it so that the police were unable to prove there was a victim to the court, and the case is dismissed. The one member of the group who was arrested, goes free.

    However, I was told by some that this is a plot hole, because the prosecution can go forward with the case, without the victim's testimony, and they would just rely on the word that there was a victim from the officers that responded, and that that would be enough.

    What do you think? Is it possible to write so that without her testimony, the cops cannot prove there was a kidnapping just by the main cop's word alone, along with the responders who only knew what he told them... and the whole case would come apart, and get dismissed, which is how I wanted to write it?

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    Last edited by ironpony; 10-26-2016 at 01:48 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member   Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Walter B's Avatar
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    You can write whatever you want. Even if it makes no sense.


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    Pro Member   Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Does this count as a plot hole in my script? khathawayart's Avatar
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    <>You can write whatever you want. Even if it makes no sense.<>
    ---------------------------------------------

    Well, sure--but if you want to hold your audience, it has to make enough sense for them not to notice it makes no sense. If they notice--you've lost the momentum of the story.


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    Well I can write it so that the prosecution goes forward with the case without her, but in the end, it is not maybe for the judge to take to trial, cause no victim is cooperating, to back up the police's statements that there was one?


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    Senior Member   Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Does this count as a plot hole in my script? Walter B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by khathawayart View Post
    <>You can write whatever you want. Even if it makes no sense.<>
    ---------------------------------------------

    Well, sure--but if you want to hold your audience, it has to make enough sense for them not to notice it makes no sense. If they notice--you've lost the momentum of the story.
    This is very true.
    My reaction should be seen in the light of a dozen more or less the same questions about the same script, where the asking of the questions seems more like an excuse to not write it, than a serious way to fix anything, since there already have been given countless options and suggestions.


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