KickStarter Relaunch
Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
+ Add Reply
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Topic: KickStarter Relaunch

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Johnny Baker started this thread.
      Johnny Baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like

  2. #2
    Senior Member   KickStarter Relaunch KickStarter Relaunch KickStarter Relaunch Walter B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Rotterdam area, The Netherlands
    Posts
    485
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I love to see you are so dedicated to your dream.
    So I really hate to say this: the perks are not the reason your previous campaign didn't succeed.

    Like I mentioned earlier on another board, people go through a 'crowdfunding journey' before they click on 'fund'.
    Basicly it are 3 questions:
    - Do I love to see this project realised?
    - Do I think the team is able to pull it off?
    - Do I like the perks? ( <-- If the project is awesome and the team has a formidable portfolio, this is the least important question)

    And these 3 questions people can only ask themselves when they are on your kickstarterpage (but I'll leave the subject of building an audience, reaching the crowd and campaigning on social media out of this reply, because although that is interesting, it is not paramount in this case.)

    I don't know everything. Far from it.
    And I don't like to be a nay-sayer. I rather try to point people in the right direction with my insights, ideas, experience and opinions.

    We had a few conversations about your short and previous campaigns on this board and elsewhere as well and when it comes to the campaign you seem to be picking up a few points to improve it.
    But to be honest: that will not be enough to make it succeed.
    I, and probably many many others, abandon their crowdfund journey on the second question: 'Do I think you can pull this off?'
    My answer is: 'No, not yet. You are a fresh, enthousiastic and motivated rookie who still needs learn to understand the medium to be able to make something great.'
    Money is not the real solution here, experience is.
    You need to make more shorts to become better so you can proof to the world you can pull your idea off.

    This is in no way meant to discourage you.
    I just believe that the energy you put in redesigning your campaign and perks can better be spent on making a new short, which can be totally different, just to explore filmmaking more and to add more finished projects to your portfolio.

    Making your first short is always a great achievement, but that first short is always never great. So now you are feeling like you can do anything (I remember that feeling) if only you had the means, but you only have that one not so great short to convince people you can actually do it if they give you money.
    So keep on creating, keep on filming. Get better and better. With experience you will probably also get a better team as the rest will grow with you and/or others want to help you as you can show more and more of your potential.
    Make a few simple short shorts of 1 or 2 minutes, that you can shoot in 1 day. This way you can learn fast. 3 months from now you can have finished at least 2 of such short shorts if you only work on them in weekends. (3 weeks to write, plan and organise, 1 weekend to shoot, 2 weeks to edit. Evaluate what went great and what wrong, make notes. Next project. Take a break to evaluate and think of a new project. Sometimes it just needs to be a simple story that is an excuse to try a certain technique.)
    Keep on creating and 2 or 3 years from now your portfolio might be convincing enough for people to fund you AND you'll have more people who already know your work. So by making more shorts you'll become more experienced, more credible, more confident, while you gain a better cast and crew, a larger fanbase, a solid reputation. All factors that will help you dream project more than selling watches with a filmstill.

    Or you can try to reinvent your perks every few weeks, but that is question 3. A question most people won't ask themselves at all at this moment in your carreer. (This is also why discussion about reaching the crowd is somewhat pointless as your conversion rate will be very low.)
    Like I said before: I don't want to discourage you, I'm just showing you the adventurous winding road that might actually lead to your goal.
    But you need to step down from your dead horse:


    BTW, your budget breakdown adds up to 110%


  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Johnny Baker started this thread.
      Johnny Baker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Walter B View Post
    I love to see you are so dedicated to your dream.
    So I really hate to say this: the perks are not the reason your previous campaign didn't succeed.

    Like I mentioned earlier on another board, people go through a 'crowdfunding journey' before they click on 'fund'.
    Basicly it are 3 questions:
    - Do I love to see this project realised?
    - Do I think the team is able to pull it off?
    - Do I like the perks? ( <-- If the project is awesome and the team has a formidable portfolio, this is the least important question)

    And these 3 questions people can only ask themselves when they are on your kickstarterpage (but I'll leave the subject of building an audience, reaching the crowd and campaigning on social media out of this reply, because although that is interesting, it is not paramount in this case.)

    I don't know everything. Far from it.
    And I don't like to be a nay-sayer. I rather try to point people in the right direction with my insights, ideas, experience and opinions.

    We had a few conversations about your short and previous campaigns on this board and elsewhere as well and when it comes to the campaign you seem to be picking up a few points to improve it.
    But to be honest: that will not be enough to make it succeed.
    I, and probably many many others, abandon their crowdfund journey on the second question: 'Do I think you can pull this off?'
    My answer is: 'No, not yet. You are a fresh, enthousiastic and motivated rookie who still needs learn to understand the medium to be able to make something great.'
    Money is not the real solution here, experience is.
    You need to make more shorts to become better so you can proof to the world you can pull your idea off.

    This is in no way meant to discourage you.
    I just believe that the energy you put in redesigning your campaign and perks can better be spent on making a new short, which can be totally different, just to explore filmmaking more and to add more finished projects to your portfolio.

    Making your first short is always a great achievement, but that first short is always never great. So now you are feeling like you can do anything (I remember that feeling) if only you had the means, but you only have that one not so great short to convince people you can actually do it if they give you money.
    So keep on creating, keep on filming. Get better and better. With experience you will probably also get a better team as the rest will grow with you and/or others want to help you as you can show more and more of your potential.
    Make a few simple short shorts of 1 or 2 minutes, that you can shoot in 1 day. This way you can learn fast. 3 months from now you can have finished at least 2 of such short shorts if you only work on them in weekends. (3 weeks to write, plan and organise, 1 weekend to shoot, 2 weeks to edit. Evaluate what went great and what wrong, make notes. Next project. Take a break to evaluate and think of a new project. Sometimes it just needs to be a simple story that is an excuse to try a certain technique.)
    Keep on creating and 2 or 3 years from now your portfolio might be convincing enough for people to fund you AND you'll have more people who already know your work. So by making more shorts you'll become more experienced, more credible, more confident, while you gain a better cast and crew, a larger fanbase, a solid reputation. All factors that will help you dream project more than selling watches with a filmstill.

    Or you can try to reinvent your perks every few weeks, but that is question 3. A question most people won't ask themselves at all at this moment in your carreer. (This is also why discussion about reaching the crowd is somewhat pointless as your conversion rate will be very low.)
    Like I said before: I don't want to discourage you, I'm just showing you the adventurous winding road that might actually lead to your goal.
    But you need to step down from your dead horse:


    BTW, your budget breakdown adds up to 110%
    Thanks for the advice. Walter B : )


+ Add Reply

Tags for this Thread



Contributing Members

Follow us on

Twitter Facebook youtube Twitter