My Favorite Short Film
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    Default My Favorite Short Film

    Hey Guys,

    Here is my favorite short film of all time, by the Master, David Lynch. It's called Blue Green. This captures my attention and interest more than any short I've seen:



    Enjoy!

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    To me this typefies the current crop of American made films, bizarre, no story, just shock value for it's own sake, or a bunch of sappy people exploring their own problems. I haven't seen a decent American dramatic film in a couple of years now, including award winning films. I watch foreign films on Netflix and enjoy them. There is a story that makes sense, and usually a happy or at least a just ending, and actors I can relate to as people.


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    Quote Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
    To me this typefies the current crop of American made films, bizarre, no story, just shock value for it's own sake, or a bunch of sappy people exploring their own problems. I haven't seen a decent American dramatic film in a couple of years now, including award winning films. I watch foreign films on Netflix and enjoy them. There is a story that makes sense, and usually a happy or at least a just ending, and actors I can relate to as people.
    Lol, David Lynch's work is certainly not typical, of any cinema in any country. I have no idea what you would be comparing this work to in terms of American cinema... And what shock value is there in this film? Literally no violence, language or disturbing imagery. The film as a whole becomes disturbing, but certainly did not utilize "shock value," to elicit a response, or any cheap or petty thrills for that matter. If you know Lynch's work at all, you would realize he doesn't follow trends or create things to shock you....he's not that petty or desperate for attention. He is a unique, accomplished filmmaker that creates work from pure inspiration. It's also an experimental, abstract short film lol...I am more surprised that you would compare apples and oranges as if they were the same thing....that is silly.

    His work typically doesn't have straight narratives, but there is certainly a story, just abstract. That's Lynch man...and I'll bet you couldn't name even one film that can legitimately be compared to this film, and the rest of Lynch's work. A legitimate comparison, not just vague generalizations like "Oh it's disturbing and Hostel is disturbing, so they're the same thing...." This film expresses the story in a very different way, and is more dependent on creating an overall feeling in you, as apposed to holding your hand and giving you a trite narrative that you have seen a million times in slightly different ways. Lynch doesn't attempt to mimic a style to make something he thinks the masses could predict or come up with themselves, the surreal and disturbing tone of his work is just the fundamental nature of his style and creativity.

    Also generalizing by putting films into 2 categories, American cinema, or Foreign cinema, is fairly closed minded. Filmmakers from around the planet have their own perspectives and unique styles. In general I have not been impressed with ANY feature films made in the last several years, but it certainly has nothing to do with what country the film was made in. Each situation is unique, and fails or succeeds for various specific reasons, not just tied to nationality.

    Last edited by Cameron; 10-03-2018 at 12:32 PM.

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    OK then, what is the story in this short film, I don't see one at all. If there is no story what is the purpose of the short film? You didn't notice any shock value in Elephant Man or Blue Velvet? You don't see a notable differences between French films and Scandanavian fims and German films and American films? Do you see a difference between crepe suzettes and ihop pancakes ... taste? quality? Do you see any difference between music today and music of the 50's and 60's and 70's? It all comes down to telling a story in music or film, and today's American pop music and films just don't generally do that. Or the story they tell seems to be incoherent babbling like Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri. It's mostly crap in my opinion. Interesting drama is way more likely to be on an HBO or Showtime series like The Deuce or the Chi than released in theaters.

    Last edited by bobspez; 10-03-2018 at 01:11 PM.

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    It's a story of cruelty toward children, the loss of a child and the torment it causes. The beauty IMO of Lynch's work is instead of telling a story like that with a detailed technical play by play of how exactly these things happened, he gives you an emotional, surreal sensory experience, that personally gives me a more pure emotional understanding of the events that he is describing to you on-screen. Since movies are just a series of audio-visual pieces, it never can give you a truly accurate representation of how life, how an experience really feels. The emotional effect a circumstance/event/people have on you. The best movies get really close, and personally I think what makes David Lynch a true master is he brings you AMAZINGLY close to legitimately experiencing an story as if you actually lived it AND AND AND he does it in a completely unique and captivating way! How could it get any more fresh and pioneering than that?!

    In cinema worldwide, there is just an overwhelming majority of traditional narratives, but that formula in many ways is direcotrs telling stories in largely the same manner, with a gem or something unique here and there. Lynch's work is truly different, exciting, memorable, and DOES tell very personal/gripping stories, in a way that allows you to live them emotionally...It's just going to either hit you, or not.

    Lynch's work is definitely polarizing, for sure, always has been. Lynch is characterized by his unique method of filmmaking, his success has come from that...he even completely blew away the master Stanley Kubrick with his first feature! Like I said, it either hits you or doesn't, but it's hard for me to swallow hearing someone say his work is typical of American cinema, lol, NO WAY DUDE! And most filmmakers/critics and scholars throughout Europe would certainly agree with me. His work is very popular out there. It IS bizarre..you are right...c'mon it's Lynch man, of course it's bizarre, his ideas are just innately like that, but certainly not forced....how the heck could you force something like that short film, or his other works?!

    And what I mean by that last statement is, the sheer craftsmanship of his cinematic sequences, the shots and how they move and are framed, the sound design, the editing....the BRILLIANT timing and editing....he really makes a surreal audio-visual experience that does not feel forced. The bad experimental films that unenthusiastic students make feel forced. The folks that have hired him to make his various films certainly didn't think his work felt forced and "bizarre for the sake of it." Those folks would have gotten their asses kicked in the film business if they couldn't feel the difference between forced art and inspired art.

    And no I don't think Blue Velvet or Elephant Man contained shock value....There is no value in the shocking things he shows you, only the dark side of humanity, wrapped up in enigmatic contexts, in surreal ways. The unique aspects of his cinematic style that I've been discussing are the real selling points of his films. In fact, the "shock value," that you are referring to that was so popular with crap like Hostel or slasher flicks (and is popular in many independent western European films like the one where some kids tie up Fassbender and some woman to logs and burn them....lol, fucked up...and the Italians invented that shock value crap back in the 60s dude...) was actually a big point of contention with Lynch films and distributors/studios. The more disturbing visual aspects of his work were always a thing that would divide audiences...no "Value," in that...but he stays true to his intentions, and visits the deepest darkest parts of humanity because that is what he is inspired to do. And Elephant Man, are you serious! The man was disfigured horribly, but was an extraordinary man with a story worth telling! The disturbing nature of his appearance was a simple fact of reality! That's life! It happened, he was a real person!

    And indeed, there are films from a variety of countries all over the planet, like you said. That is why I was saying lumping films into only 2 categories with your first reply: American or foreign, is just too much of a generalization...the quality of films and dedication to the art varies drastically country to country, and depends on various factors...Have you ever seen some of those Ugandan action movies?! Lol lol lol...the directors making those could do away with the goal of making an epic action film with the tiny or no budget they have, and tell a personal/emotional story in an impressive way instead. Do what you can with what you have, like many filmmakers before them that had nothing but a camera. Those Ugandan films are "foreign," films...but should they be lumped into a category with some of the cooler movies being made in the UK or France. Lol...no....maybe someday, but not now.

    Anyway, I always love discussing stuff like this!


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    Well I can see you are a big David Lynch fan, and I'm glad you enjoy his work. And like you said people either like him or they don't. I believe it's a matter of taste, not knowledge. I've seen several of his films, Blue Velvet, Dune, Elephant Man, and now this short. I didn't get what you did from the short. I saw a kid intent on running somewhere, a distraught dazed woman walking around in her nightgown, and a pervy type guy with a camera lurking in a basement, with a jarring soundtrack. That's all I saw.

    For me Lynch's films are best decribed as bizarre, a world populated by freaks of one kind or another. These are not like any people I have known or would want to know. I can't connect with any of them. They are creations of a rather bizarre and weird guy. Reminds me a bit of Frank Zappa. Some people thought he was a musical genius. I could never identify with anything he did.

    There's lots of somewhat weird movies I have liked like Paris Texas, Taxi Driver, Saturday Night Fever, 2001 Space Odyssey, The Shining, and more conventional story lines like Charade, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Bus Stop, Moonstruck. To me, each of these movies was perfectly made for what they were, had a story that held my interest and made sense to me. I came away thinking they were great movies. I just don't get that from Lynch. I'm glad you do.


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    Quote Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
    Well I can see you are a big David Lynch fan, and I'm glad you enjoy his work. And like you said people either like him or they don't. I believe it's a matter of taste, not knowledge. I've seen several of his films, Blue Velvet, Dune, Elephant Man, and now this short. I didn't get what you did from the short. I saw a kid intent on running somewhere, a distraught dazed woman walking around in her nightgown, and a pervy type guy with a camera lurking in a basement, with a jarring soundtrack. That's all I saw.

    For me Lynch's films are best decribed as bizarre, a world populated by freaks of one kind or another. These are not like any people I have known or would want to know. I can't connect with any of them. They are creations of a rather bizarre and weird guy. Reminds me a bit of Frank Zappa. Some people thought he was a musical genius. I could never identify with anything he did.

    There's lots of somewhat weird movies I have liked like Paris Texas, Taxi Driver, Saturday Night Fever, 2001 Space Odyssey, The Shining, and more conventional story lines like Charade, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Bus Stop, Moonstruck. To me, each of these movies was perfectly made for what they were, had a story that held my interest and made sense to me. I came away thinking they were great movies. I just don't get that from Lynch. I'm glad you do.
    Thanks! Yeah honestly I think Lynch is tapping into a very particular part of the psyche, so much so that it sometimes just does not connect with certain viewers. Like, I think it is almost a physical reaction to some of the sequences that he makes that gets people interested. He really is riding the roller coaster of his bizarre ideas, without thinking much of the audience lol.


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