Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons?
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Topic: Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons?

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    Daniel Arbon started this thread.
      Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? Daniel Arbon's Avatar
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    Default Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons?

    Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum.

    As the title suggests, are there any noticable downsides to using a deadcat/windjammer on "blimp" when recording outside in light winds?

    I'm often in a situation where I have to record my own sound, either into camera or external recorder. I own a Tascam Dr40, Sennheiser MKE600 and a rycote windshield and windjammer. Obviously in high wind using both the windshield and windjammer is best bet, but in light wind conditions is there any audio advantage to recording (mostly dialogue) without the windjammer/deadcat, or best just leave it on.

    Appreciate any advice.

    Dan

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    Super Moderator   Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? Any "deadcat/windjammer" cons? mara's Avatar
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    I don't know the answer to your question, but welcome to Filmmaker Forum!

    Screenwriter and script consultant: www.maralesemann.com

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    Senior Member   ironpony's Avatar
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    I find that the windjammer has a slight muffling sound to it, when I have done tests. Basically it's like hearing someone speak, while wearing a nitcap over your ears. You can still hear a person clearly, but you can hear more clearly, with the nitcap taken off of your ears, if that makes sense.

    When it comes to shooting my own projects outdoors, I won't use it unless I need it, but when I am recording sound for other people's projects, I feel that it's best to leave it on, in case any wind changes or anything like that, just as a safety.


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    Junior Member   awpixfilms's Avatar
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    I guess that it's a matter of personal preferences but I completely disagree with ironpony. I personally rent the 440 or 600 when available , with a blimp (with an internal shockmount) and a dead cat. I prefer the rode blimp to the sennheiser but that's not the point in this topic here.
    The sound of dialogs comes out basically post-ready. Meaning that the track is ready to go. As shot all the way to the final cut. For other sounds I find that a little reverb (or similar processing) may be needed. but with a blimp and a dead cat the only thing to adjust is the volume. So to answer your question and based on my personal preference I'd leave it on. A note about the blimp: not only removes the wind and unnecessary distractions but it keeps the mike from the little bumps from the boom or the mount as well.
    Of course the blimp makes the voices a little different. but better and post-free. And that's the reason why they invented the blimps, no?


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    Junior Member   Pinkstar's Avatar
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    Agreed, outside, blimp and deadcat it up. :)


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    Senior Member   ironpony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by awpixfilms View Post
    I guess that it's a matter of personal preferences but I completely disagree with ironpony. I personally rent the 440 or 600 when available , with a blimp (with an internal shockmount) and a dead cat. I prefer the rode blimp to the sennheiser but that's not the point in this topic here.
    The sound of dialogs comes out basically post-ready. Meaning that the track is ready to go. As shot all the way to the final cut. For other sounds I find that a little reverb (or similar processing) may be needed. but with a blimp and a dead cat the only thing to adjust is the volume. So to answer your question and based on my personal preference I'd leave it on. A note about the blimp: not only removes the wind and unnecessary distractions but it keeps the mike from the little bumps from the boom or the mount as well.
    Of course the blimp makes the voices a little different. but better and post-free. And that's the reason why they invented the blimps, no?
    Oh okay, well I thought that the blimp was only used if you have to, as I have never seen it used indoors, and indoors they always use a smaller cover in comparison. So I thought it was only use it if you have to, otherwise there might be slight muffling, but this probably only with the deadcat on as well. If blimps should be used all the time, then why do I never see people use them indoors?


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