How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques?
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Topic: How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques?

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    Default How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques?

    What I mean is, when it comes to shooting a movie, I can't shoot it how big budget movies can do it, cause I don't have near as much equipment to do it how they do. So I find myself having to come up with completely original shots, and even editing techniques, that I have never seen in a movie before.

    But if I have never seen it in a movie before, how do you know it will work, especially when everyone has something different to say? When it comes to knowing which rules can be broken, is their any guidelines you follow, or can some rules not be broken no matter what?

    I was just wondering if anyone had any similar experiences to learn from when it comes to having to do that on a microbudget?

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    Super Moderator   How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? mara's Avatar
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    You don't know. Even if the big guns/big money people don't know, otherwise there wouldn't be so many failures. You make the money the best you can, then cross your fingers and hope for the best.

    A friend of mine is in the horror re-make Grudge (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3612126/reference). We were discussing - just the other day - the fact that Sony is releasing that, among other movies, with the new 4DX technology. Will moviegoers like that? Hate it? Help the movie's success? Only time will tell.

    Screenwriter and script consultant: www.maralesemann.com

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    Member   bobspez's Avatar
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    Post links to your clips here and see what other members think of them. If you get no feedback it means that no one was particularly impressed. Then you need to decide if you are making videos for the audience or for yourself. If for yourself then only you have to like them.


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    Oh well I am talking about a new project I am doing that I want to shoot very differently. I haven't really broken any rules in past ones I don't think.


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    Junior Member   How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? How do you know what the audience will accept when it comes to original techniques? AJ Young's Avatar
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    I wouldn't concern myself with what I have in comparison to a big budget film. The fundamentals of storytelling transcend the tools you have available.

    If you truly want to "break the rules" then check out low budget films that fall under the avant garde category.

    If you want to see some low budget indie films that felt original and embraced their limitations, then look at:
    • Upstream Color
    • Blue Ruin
    • Clerks
    • Following
    • This is Us (directed by Jerry White)
    • Mandao of the Dead
    • Puffy Chair (and other Duplass brothers films)


    ---

    I should also point out that you can do anything as a filmmaker, so long as your audience understands. Conventional filmmaking rules like the 180 line, 45 degree shift, etc are commonly used because it doesn't confuse the audience. But those "rules" sometimes can be broken when the audience will not be confused.

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    Okay thanks. Basically I have to move the camera differently compared to the movement you see in mainstream movies, and I have to edit differently as well sometimes. I haven't seen any of those movies actually and can check them out. Thanks.

    The only Duplass movie I saw was Bad Milo, but even that one followed conventional cinema I felt.


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    Junior Member   abstractthoughtmachine's Avatar
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    I think an audience can be extremely accepting of any style if you can show them to trust you, and that you know what you're doing when it comes to you and your style.

    Establish in your film that it's going to be shot or edited in a certain way by showing them very early OR if you want to surprise them with a unique shot or edit, at least establish in some way that there are exciting surprises ahead when they watch your film - tease them.


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    Junior Member   awpixfilms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJ Young View Post

    I should also point out that you can do anything as a filmmaker, so long as your audience understands. Conventional filmmaking rules like the 180 line, 45 degree shift, etc are commonly used because it doesn't confuse the audience. But those "rules" sometimes can be broken when the audience will not be confused.

    quite the opposite, I'm afraid. Those rules are there for a reason with nothing to do with the budget. For example: build a pretty young actress fighting scene. Do it without those rules (or not knowing the rules or in purpose) and will result in ridiculous and laughable material that will only make the audience immediately look for the exit or door or remote or mouse click away. No matter how good the script was or how famous the actors are or how pretty the actress is (and those are the most important assets in any production, ANY, along with an experienced crew knowing and following those rules by the way.


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    Okay so you are saying to not break the rules at all then and follow them quite vigorously? That's actually more of a challenge for me cause I have to work on very low budget which means having to break certain rules and shooting scenes in more original ways to work around limitations though. What does a filmmaker do in that case?


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