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What's your first-impression opinion of the lighting and overall look of this shot?
What's your first-impression opinion of the lighting and overall look of this shot?
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Topic: What's your first-impression opinion of the lighting and overall look of this shot?

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    hmasin12 started this thread.
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    Red face What's your first-impression opinion of the lighting and overall look of this shot?



    This is a still from my new short movie. I'm just a beginner but this is the most ambitious lighting setup I've ever tried (tame, I know). What's your impression from a cinematography stand-point? Lighting, framing? I'm new to this but don't go easy!

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    Junior Member   TheMachinimator's Avatar
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    Hi! I am just finishing up my college course about filmmaking and animation so I know what you feel right now XD.

    Feedback wise you need to try and balance the shot a little more. The harsh red light on the glossed posters don't really work well and the dark blue on the face indicates some otherworldly thing. If you're going for a computer or phone screen they cast light white or pale blue light mostly. try lowering the intensity of both a little and adding some kind of fill with a normal white / yellow light.

    Does that help?


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    Junior Member   Joakley's Avatar
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    I’m new as well, and learning as I go. Currently a student at YouTube University.

    Anyway, in my not-so-professional opinion, it looks like something along the lines of “checkerboard” lighting. Which is actually pretty cool. Not sure if that’s what you were going for, but it kind of looks like it.

    I’m personally not a fan of loud colors and all that but the scene itself looks interesting. Looks like an 80s Nintendo commercial or something.


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    Junior Member   JackMiller7's Avatar
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    The DR of the lighting surpasses that of what your camera can capture, you should focus on capturing a range of light that is with in the limits of your cameras sensor and file type capacity. As for artistically and directionally its perfectly fine. You should always try to get most of the image exposed in the 40-60% ire range.

    Colorists by trade

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    Junior Member   Joakley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackMiller7 View Post
    The DR of the lighting surpasses that of what your camera can capture, you should focus on capturing a range of light that is with in the limits of your cameras sensor and file type capacity. As for artistically and directionally its perfectly fine. You should always try to get most of the image exposed in the 40-60% ire range.
    Forgive me for asking dumb questions here...so if it’s above 60% or below 40% it’s at risk of being too “crushed” or whatever?

    And you can determine what % you’re at by the histogram display?


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    Pro Member   Anonymous Filmmaker's Avatar
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    Nice work! I like the colors you picked and the production design that went into the back wall.

    I would frame the boy so there's less space above his head. If you want to still show off the posters, just move the camera down. Unless there is a reason it is in frame, I would keep the window out of the shot. Also, try to diffuse the light hitting the boy's face. A pillowcase would do the trick on a budget. Also, if you do keep the window in frame, keep in mind that the light hitting the back of his head is red, where it would have a colder color temperature if it were really coming from the window. You may want to add a "kicker" that outlines the back of his head in the color temperature light that the window would produce. Keep up the good work!

    -AF


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