Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

HUNDRED$ : A Short Film coming soon

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HUNDRED$ : A Short Film coming soon

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Web size poster.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.3 KB
ID:	60659

    Hey Filmmaker Forum and fellow Aspiring Filmmakers!

    Please enjoy my first short film, "Hundred$" (Running Time: 5:08):

    Money changes people for the worst. Amy & Steve are no exception; together they murdered for it and now they're setting out to bury the body with a duffle bag of bundled hundred dollar bills in hand, but the money isn't done whispering evil into their ears.


    This actually turned out slightly better than I was expecting when I first hit the editing desk with the footage, but it wasn't without a lot of hard work in post production, especially on the audio...

    This was shot using a consumer Panasonic camera, an AT897 Shotgun Microphone, Tascam DR-40 Linear PCM Rercorder, Edited with Adobe Premiere CC, Adobe After Effects CC, and Sound Design/Foley was done in Adobe Audition CC.

    "Hundred$" was very eye opening for me. I think I've come away from it with some really good lessons. I learned just how important audio and soundtrack are - I realized just how much it is true that it is rarely the video that makes a film feel amateur. The day I finished the first cut of footage (day Three of Post), I was swearing and throwing things around like an angry sailor; the project felt like crap no matter how much I tweaked the cuts and video (of course, better coverage during shooting would have really helped).

    The audio was bad. Really bad. I set my levels way to low on my recorder for one, and I was the only crew, so I had to hold my own boom. I kept on taking the audio files into Audition, one by one, and over processing them to try and get the noise out and post-amplify them. Finally, it dawned on me that I was going at it the wrong way. I forgot about Foley.

    So, the first thing I did is: I went out of town to a very remote bluff of trees, jacked up the levels on my recorder and just stood there listening to nature make it's noise while recording it in ways I never knew possible. Then, I took it in to Audition, deleted any sounds that weren't nice and created a 2 minute ambience track. Because the noise is so random and it's being made by animals and insects, it cut together and hid nearly everything and suddenly filled in the entire feeling of the whole thing, plus I could jack up my dialogue and really cover the over amplification. But, by this point, I had completely trashed the dialog clips learning how to work with Audition. So, I went to the net, read as much as I could about sweetening dialogue and started taking Audition really serious. Than I learned about the dynamic link where I could import the whole project into Audition from Premiere. So I imported the project and with all my audio cuts in and the ability to sync with video, I went about screwing up all of my dialog two more times (had to delete clip and re-find original in full-length recording each time), and then finally started to get the compressor and EQ settings right. I still need to work on my audio skills, but I got further than I imagined.

    It's not the super-amazing-internet-blockbuster short film I envisioned in my head, but I can't wait to see how much I can improve with my next project(and hopefully with a better camera). It's really helped me get motivated and add these experiences to my future planning. Plus, I think putting this out there in my area will really help drum up support when I need help on that next project.

    I'd love to hear feedback (like "Where'd the shovel go?"), and any constructive criticism from some of you veterans. ;-)
    Last edited by spacecadetmotionpictures; 07-08-2013, 12:01 AM. Reason: Updated with Video Release

  • #2
    I can't wait!
    -AF

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      Updated Original Post with the Video

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow! I love it! Music is great, and editing to the music makes it much better to watch. I like the cinematography overall. At some points, the actors talking is too quiet, and it doesn't balance with the level the music was at the begging. I don't know if adjustment layers work on audio, but try that, because it seems like that may be helpful for you. The foley was good. I thought that some of the time, you should have locked down the camera, because that "handheld look" only works some of the time. I only like to use it when characters are running or something, and if there was live coverage and it was a real event, they would have to be going handheld after them. Just a slight plot problem, the ending would have worked better if they were wearing gloves. Where did you get the music? Overall, really great job!
        -AF

        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          The audio was the downside of this one. But it's your first film, so mistakes are to be expected. My first film was CRAP. But that's why you keep working at it and tweaking your skills little by little.

          Just stay at it for the next couple years, soaking everything in that you can, and just keep making films no matter what. If you do this, I guarantee you'll see a dramatic change 100%

          Also that must have sucked to have to hold your own boom lol. You might want to snag a couple extra friends to help you out for crew stuff. I think just having extra sets of hands around could improve your quality as well.

          Comment


          • #6
            I liked the way the action was clipped along with the music in the beginning. But, yes, it was difficult to hear the speaking parts.
            L A Morgan
            Novels, Screenplays, Short Scripts, and Music
            http://lamorganwriter.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Very good! I reckon one of the most important things to take away from a finished product is experience, and it seems as if you've learned allot, as have I recently.

              I can't say anything that hasn't been pointed out, but I have two suggestions:

              Showing the passage of time during the walk in the woods could have made the scene a little more drastic. It seemed as if they weren't walking too far in.

              As stated, it must have sucked to have held the boom mic as well as taking charge of everything else. Perhaps a tripod could have helped you out on this one - failing that, the obvious extra pair of hands!

              Good job!
              "Nobody knows anything"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Anonymous Filmmaker View Post
                Wow! I love it! Music is great, and editing to the music makes it much better to watch. I like the cinematography overall. At some points, the actors talking is too quiet, and it doesn't balance with the level the music was at the begging. I don't know if adjustment layers work on audio, but try that, because it seems like that may be helpful for you. The foley was good. I thought that some of the time, you should have locked down the camera, because that "handheld look" only works some of the time. I only like to use it when characters are running or something, and if there was live coverage and it was a real event, they would have to be going handheld after them. Just a slight plot problem, the ending would have worked better if they were wearing gloves. Where did you get the music? Overall, really great job!
                Thanks, AF!

                I hear ya about the handheld footage. After seeing Aaron Jones' build his own shoulder rig, I think I'll be building my own before the next project. But this brings me to one of the things I learned, which is coverage. I should have shot more takes of each scene, including one locked down and one handheld, plus of course, some more wide and close ups.

                Out of everything I hate the most about this, it's the plot problems. I hate them in big films and I have vowed to being very plot conscious on my own stuff. But, to add to my experience: once I was in the heat of shooting, I realized just how big a directors job is and once I got to editing, I realized just how easily things can slip by you.

                I got the music from Incomptech.com, which is created by a guy named Kevin MacLeod. It's all attribution licencing, so just make sure to give proper credit and use. I was actually surprised the quality of his work, considering it's free to use.

                Originally posted by MrJay10 View Post
                The audio was the downside of this one. But it's your first film, so mistakes are to be expected. My first film was CRAP. But that's why you keep working at it and tweaking your skills little by little.

                Just stay at it for the next couple years, soaking everything in that you can, and just keep making films no matter what. If you do this, I guarantee you'll see a dramatic change 100%

                Also that must have sucked to have to hold your own boom lol. You might want to snag a couple extra friends to help you out for crew stuff. I think just having extra sets of hands around could improve your quality as well.
                Oh, the audio... OH! THE AUDIO!!

                While this project was important for me to make a lot of mistakes with and learn a lot of stuff, I have to say that audio became the stand-out lesson of it all. For starters, I really should have recorded at a much higher gain level, and for two, I need to do whatever it takes to find someone to hold my mic boom.

                It's been very hard finding help around here. Unfortunately, I live in an area that is dominated by the oil industry and where creativity is rarely rewarded much less expected. I have quit so many jobs because my creativity got me in trouble. There is a mentality around here that if you aren't making money doing something, than why do it at all. And it's like people are almost scared to be creative or passionate about anything. But I'm sure that once my friends and associates see Hundred$ and some of my future projects, that will change in the space around me. This was a part of my reasoning for getting this done (among many reasons). I feel that with this out there, It will be easier to get people on board for the next project.

                Originally posted by MasterDisaster View Post
                Very good! I reckon one of the most important things to take away from a finished product is experience, and it seems as if you've learned allot, as have I recently.

                I can't say anything that hasn't been pointed out, but I have two suggestions:

                Showing the passage of time during the walk in the woods could have made the scene a little more drastic. It seemed as if they weren't walking too far in.

                As stated, it must have sucked to have held the boom mic as well as taking charge of everything else. Perhaps a tripod could have helped you out on this one - failing that, the obvious extra pair of hands!

                Good job!
                I wanted to go further into the woods, but there were a lot of problems. Primarily, my talent was in a rush to get done, and they started getting frustrated with the bugs and thistles. Plus, there were a lot of people at the lake that day, which really restricted where we could go and what angles we could shoot. At one point, my talent suggested coming back down in a month (they live 3 hrs away) to reshoot and get the stuff we missed, but I really just wanted to see something through from start to finish, and I don't regret that. I figure that when they come back down, we can focus on something entirely new, based on my experience during production and post, and based on their experience watching their own performance; this was basically their first experience with acting in a scripted production (in which the script got thrown out anyways. LOL), so I think that next time they'll make better decisions with their wardrobe and have more comfort in front of the camera. I also hope that they'll take it a bit more serious next time. I believe that they can be really amazing actors with more experience.

                Either way, I'm glad to just put my first under my belt. It's not amazing, but it's something to stand on.
                ****

                Thanks for all the comments! It's really good to come here and be able to talk about the project. For the most part, my friends and family go blank-faced when I start talking about these things.

                This forum, believe it or not, has been one of the most amazing discoveries I've made in a long time. This place and you guys/gals have been really instrumental in inspiring me. Everytime I get a Like or a Friend Request, it makes me feel really great and helps reassure me that I am taking the right path in life. I just sometimes wish I wasn't so far away in the great white north, so some of us could get together and collaborate on a project.

                Cheers!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by spacecadetmotionpictures View Post
                  It's been very hard finding help around here. Unfortunately, I live in an area that is dominated by the oil industry and where creativity is rarely rewarded much less expected. I have quit so many jobs because my creativity got me in trouble. There is a mentality around here that if you aren't making money doing something, than why do it at all. And it's like people are almost scared to be creative or passionate about anything. But I'm sure that once my friends and associates see Hundred$ and some of my future projects, that will change in the space around me. This was a part of my reasoning for getting this done (among many reasons). I feel that with this out there, It will be easier to get people on board for the next project
                  Good for you man. Just ignore the haters and keep pushing towards what you love. Even when everyone around you says you can't, just get right back up and do it anyways. Make a film that will make them shutup for good lol. I wish you luck my man!

                  As far as getting help maybe start posting ads online, but really get to know those people before you trust them with handling your equipment. Even if you just get one or two people, they'll know people, who know more people, etc. Networking is the name of the game.

                  I started out at 13, just filming myself around my house and neighborhood with only the help of my brother and a couple friends. At 20 I finally took an internship at a professional production company and my eyes opened to the possibilities. Confidence, networking, and not being afraid to pursue what you love at any cost are the keys!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wanted to add something that might be a useful tip to anyone else working with a consumer camcorder.

                    I've had a lot of comments that HUNDRED$ has a very 'cinematic look' to it from Family and Friends.

                    Now, it's important to note that I am the only filmmaker in my circles and I do take this as a compliment from the average layperson. I look at the footage and still see "CAMCORDER" written all over it, as I am sure you all do as well. However, for camcorder footage captured at 60 interlaced (60i) frames per second, it does have a certain cinematic quality to the finished product. It's not great, of course, but when I compared the edited footage to the raw footage, there is a huge difference.

                    To the point: When I created the project in Adobe Premiere, I created it with a framerate of 24 progressive frames. On purpose, because I was actually hoping to get the result I did with it. Now, this is almost counter-intuitive, and I have read warnings about using an editing program to convert framerates on the internet. I also got plenty of warnings from Premiere when I was dropping the footage into the timeline asking me to either change my project settings to match the footage or to force the footage to match the project settings. By default, Premiere expects you to change the project settings. However, I knew I wanted 24fps and went against the grain.

                    I know I'm not the first to do this and I'm sure that some of you already do this when you're stuck working with 60i footage, so I don't think I've discovered anything new. However, I do see a lot of edited videos around the internet that people have tried to make look cinematic, but that are always in 60i and fail to get that 'feel', so I figured that this little tip might help some get a bit closer with the camera they have. Of course, the best option would be to change the camera settings if possible to 24p, but my camera has only one option - 60i. And of course, the best option would be a full frame camera like the Canon D5.... (soon, I hope)

                    The downside, however, is that the rendering time was excruciating long. For my five minutes of finished video, it took over an hour.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Reading these comments I seem to agre, aside from the audio levels in a few parts this turned out great! especially for a first film! I also like the way the video is chopped with the music in the intro. Good work.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This may sound a bit silly, but... I have made my first money as a filmmaker!!!

                        Although, I wouldn't exactly break out the champagne just yet, because I don't think I'd really want to drink any champagne you could buy for 3 cents, which is the amount Hundred$ has earned in ad revenue to date.

                        I'm excited about it, not because I can quit my janitorial job tomorrow and feed myself with my craft, but because these three pennies mark a start to getting there. As the tagline for Prometheus said: "Big Things Have Small Beginnings"

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X