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Which camera gives the movie "look"

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  • Which camera gives the movie "look"

    Hey guys, so Ive been filming some video and really learning the ropes. I fully believe that I can film a horror film that can sell. I have a really cool idea that will require very few lights etc...

    My question is which camera is best to get the best "movie look" I dont want this to look like a home video or a soap opera.

    Thank you in advance

  • #2
    This is an impossible question. You just want a camera that has lots of latitude, meaning all of the colors appear closer to gray. No contrast or saturation more than necessary. Then, in post you can get the look you want.
    -AF

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    • #3
      Your question is a bit contradictory, Eric. The "movie look" is largely determined by the quality of the lighting and production design, not by the camera. A skilled DP can give you the "movie look" using an iPhone, while the best camera in the world will nevertheless deliver amateurish images when wielded by an amateur.
      2001 Productions Web Site

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      • #4
        The two guys above are right, but i'm going to give you the answer you're looking for. You're gonna want to go for a DSLR. We use a canon t4i and a 50mm 1.8 Fstop Lens.
        It comes out pretty cinematic.
        Also, any amount of aspect ratio vastly improves the effect.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfaHmHAFL2Q

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        • #5
          The RED or EPIC by RED will do the job.

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          • #6
            2001 Productions was spot on. Camera itself does not matter as much. Develop the skills and knowledge of angles, composition, writing, lighting, and then move onto the bigger equipment before you spend a bunch of money and realize you were in over your head.

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            • #7
              It all depends on the DP and his skills with a camera. It also depends on post production. Depending on the tone of the film, when you are working with the film in post, you need to make sure you make your Color Correction the tone what you want to be set for your film.

              It really all depends on what kind of feel you are going for. But in all honesty its all about your DP and his skills and your post production work on your footage.

              But if you are going to get into cameras. I would just recommend getting the best if you have no set budget and get the RED EPIC.

              But if you are talking DSLR's and you want the best. Get the Canon 5D Mark III, or II. Then you have the 7D, the 60D, then a lot of T3i, T4i, T5i, T2i, ect. Then you have the Nikons, which I personally don't like.

              Then you have cameras like the Blackmagic, The GH2, ect.

              It all boils down to your person preference.
              http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOnlyHavey

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              • #8
                Originally posted by brianknapp View Post
                The camera itself does not matter just add some color correction in post.
                This isn't quite the case. A bad camera, when color corrected, will appear grainy, and therefore less cinematic. 2001 Productions was definitely right when talking about how much of a difference a good DP makes.
                -AF

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                • #9
                  The camera is a very significant part of the production. The type is not. Visit different electronic stores & start by playing around with different lenses & cameras. This will give you an idea of what works for you :)


                  Originally posted by brianknapp View Post
                  The camera itself does not matter just add some color correction in post.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by FilmBreak View Post
                    The camera is a very significant part of the production. The type is not. Visit different electronic stores & start by playing around with different lenses & cameras. This will give you an idea of what works for you :)
                    I know this is the third time I am saying this, but when doing so, turn down contrast, saturation, etc. If you get a dull looking image that is high quality, it could work for you.
                    -AF

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                    • #11
                      Yea. AF is right.

                      I forgot to mention that whenever I made my last post. Whenever you are filming, make sure that you try to film in a neutral balance. Turn down everything...but don't create a B&W look.

                      You have way more room to do Color Correction in post when you do so.
                      http://www.youtube.com/user/TheOnlyHavey

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                      • #12
                        I disagree with the whole turn down everything and shoot dull. The problem with that is, is you loose quality when you try to add it back in. If you want a desaturated look with no contrast, then go for it, but if you want to add saturation and contrast later, I find you loose quality afterwards, rather than having it in camera to begin with.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ironpony View Post
                          I disagree with the whole turn down everything and shoot dull. The problem with that is, is you loose quality when you try to add it back in. If you want a desaturated look with no contrast, then go for it, but if you want to add saturation and contrast later, I find you loose quality afterwards, rather than having it in camera to begin with.
                          I'm pretty sure this varies by camera and codec
                          -AF

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                          • #14
                            That's true, if you have a camera that shoots in RAW it should be okay, but a lot of the cameras that people on here choose to buy, are not.

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