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  • Edited Films

    Hello, i know this is a bit off topic but i don't know where else to ask. Anyway, who would i have to contact to have permission to edit that film and sell it? Can i just get a license or would i have to contact every film owner individually (which would take ages!).

  • #2
    Which film are you talking about? You just wrote "that film"
    Distribber - Keep 100% of your film's revenue

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    • #3
      Jut any generic film.

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      • #4
        So you want to re-edit random films and sell them?
        -AF

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        • #5
          Yes, but only ones that people would like me to do. And it would be for free. I basically want to edit films to meet people needs like cutting out scenes, bleeping swear words etc.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by IndieMovieMaker View Post
            Yes, but only ones that people would like me to do. And it would be for free. I basically want to edit films to meet people needs like cutting out scenes, bleeping swear words etc.
            Well, you wouldn't to be able to sell their films without an agreement. An editor would either get a solid fee or payed by the hour, but not to distribute it.
            -AF

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            • #7
              Are you asking if you can be an editor on someone's film?

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              • #8
                No, it is just an idea i have.

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                • #9
                  What if the film is being distributed free on streaming websites? And the film is an academic/socially oriented documentary satisfying free use qualifications of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. And the edited material consists of content from other documentaries. Would this edited material be fair use in some capacity?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Spartacus View Post
                    What if the film is being distributed free on streaming websites? And the film is an academic/socially oriented documentary satisfying free use qualifications of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. And the edited material consists of content from other documentaries. Would this edited material be fair use in some capacity?
                    As long as you give credit, it should.
                    -AF

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                    • #11
                      The amount of time that has been spent trying to find a loophole to use other peoples work as your own you could have written, cast, film, and edited something of your own.

                      The fair use of copyrighted material in multimedia projects lasts for two years only. After two years, obtain permission before using the project again (Lehman, 1998, p. 53).

                      Why spend all this time on something you legally have to take down in 2 years? Unless it is for a school project the return on this is nonexistant.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Anonymous Filmmaker View Post
                        As long as you give credit, it should.
                        Where can I learn the requirements for properly giving credit to sources? Is it more than just listing them at the end of the film?

                        Originally posted by Jsthompson79 View Post
                        The fair use of copyrighted material in multimedia projects lasts for two years only. After two years, obtain permission before using the project again (Lehman, 1998, p. 53).
                        Wow thank you I did not know this, this certainly changes the game. I can see how it can be pointless to edit copyrighted material for fair use.
                        Originally posted by Jsthompson79 View Post
                        Why spend all this time on something you legally have to take down in 2 years?
                        Unless it is for a school project the return on this is nonexistant.
                        I would probably not include anything that needed to be taken down after two years but anyways the return is being entirely derived from the dissemination of the ideas demonstrated in the film.

                        Originally posted by Jsthompson79 View Post
                        The amount of time that has been spent trying to find a loophole to use other peoples work as your own you could have written, cast, film, and edited something of your own.
                        I'm not considering the idea of filming my own material because it will be all interviews and the interviews from other films I was considering are with people who I couldn't possibly interview myself, like prominent economists, politicians etc. I hope to clarify what methods I am capable of using to produce the film while avoiding a fair use that would thus be required to be taken down after two years of posting without subsequent permission.

                        Documentaries often need to show pictures of historical figures/events, clips from major news programs, newspaper articles etc. which I believe would basically all be copyrighted by some entity so how could it be the case that free use lasts for two years then one needs permission in all these intricate instances? Do documentaries films all get permission to edit and include each picture and major news program clip? News program clips often include corporate logos; to my knowledge corporate logos need to be censored without permission, what’s the deal there? In any event, how would a streaming website know if you got all the required clearances? By the way I realize that talking about this stuff is filled with grey areas and short of consulting a lawyer you can only get suggestions.

                        In the case of using the material from a previously made documentary, what if it is the case that something was said by an individual in an interview which directly corresponds to the flow of my film and could only be covered by my film by referencing the previously made documentary in some comprehensive way like quoting its script or simply editing part of that film into mine.

                        I guess I may just be pressing for a loophole but I feel like the situation I am in is one in which I am not passing off another’s work as my own if I am only referencing their material and extrapolating my original ideas from them. To reiterate, the film I am making will be posted free on a streaming website and satisfies the free use qualifications of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. I’m also trying to reconcile the fact that tons of amateur documentaries on streaming websites are composed largely of other documentaries. I am wondering if anyone has any input on the topic of documentaries on streaming websites with many views and contain a lot of copyrighted material.

                        If anyone can give me some direction as far as learning about getting permissions that would be terrific.
                        What would the status be on editing and including lectures at colleges posted on streaming sites?

                        What about using audio from audiobooks when quoting? Could I include the audio of a couple paragraphs for example and obviously give credit?

                        I know this is a lot, help is much appreciated. I am eager to begin really gets the wheels spinning on this film but need to straighten all this out first and have been reading a lot but have not found these specific issues.

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                        • #13
                          In this video for "Anonymous" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZKEXK4ueFY posted on May 23, 2013, almost two minutes of the film "V for Vendetta" is shown followed by a political excursion. The video has over 500,000 views. There are tons of examples on Youtube like this. I am wondering what the legality associated with this.

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                          • #14
                            The was a documentary on Netflix streaming not too long ago that was about this very subject. I forget the film's title but it was about a guy who ran a video store in Utah who began re-editing popular Hollywood films for his customers to take out sex scenes, cursing, excessive violence, and anything else he found objectionable. His argument was that he was providing a service for the people who'd rather watch the "cleaned-up" versions, and not actually selling the re-edited films, so he claimed it fell under fair use. He turned it into a pretty big business until Hollywood stepped in a shut him down - and they DID shut him down. A court ruled that you can't alter a copyrighted work without the copyright owner's permission.
                            Matt Crunk
                            Writer/Producer/Director/Actor
                            Fiveacre Films Productions

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