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  • DSLR lens

    Just got my 600D from ebay, it has the 50mm EF lens, which seems a bit narrow.
    I'm thinking it would be wider on a full frame camera without the crop factor, what do you DSLR guys use?
    When people rave about the 'nifty fifty' are they using full frame camera's?
    The correct lens group for the 600D are the EF-S lenses, so does this mean that a 50mm EF-S lens on a 600D would give the same picture size as having a 50mm EF lens on a full frame camera.
    You see what I'm saying? If I use an EF lens then I would have to work out the crop factor to find its true focal length (on my camera) but if I use an EF-S lens would I still need to calculate crop factor.
    Thanks, Martyn.

  • #2
    Here is a link to a discussion on crop factor. http://digital-photography-school.co...tor-explained/

    It's a confusing subject. What you need to know is that a 50mm lens is a 50 is a 50. It behaves identically no matter what camera you put it on. That being said, a camera with a (small sensor) which translates to a (large crop factor) will only see a small part of the picture that that lens is projecting to it. In that way there is less field of view and so to get the same field of view you'd need a wider lens such as a 24 or something.

    A normal range from wide to medium closeup on a crop sensor would be 18-55 or so. That gives you wide to tight'ish and let's you learn the basics of focal length.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the explanation and the link, it's all very helpful.
      Martyn.

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      • #4
        The camera you have has the ASP-C sensor. It has a 1.6 crop factor. That means to get a lens with a 50mm look you need to get a 80mm lens. You cannot get the exact lens (35 x 1.6=56mm) but a 35mm that Canon makes will be close.

        The reason for the desirability of the 50mm lens look is because that is what normal vision looks like. It doesn't look zoomed in or extra wide. However, your 50mm lens, with the 1.6 crop factor, looks like an 80mm lens. That's why images look too close. You need to get a 35mm lens to fill this need.

        Steve

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        • #5
          Thanks Steve,
          I got a great explanation from the link by BlareMedia above, it is a website for still photography but has a lot of articles relevant to filmmakers. I was completely off base with my lens idea's but now I'm up to speed. What threw me was the different lens's for full frame and ASP-C and that led me to think that a 50mm full frame would give the same frame size as a 50mm ASP-C.
          As you say any 50mm lens on an ASP-C will give the same look as a 80mm lens on a full frame camera.
          It's great to be able to ask people on this forum because I would have been on the wrong track entirely otherwise.
          Now I have my chart of lens equivalents, funny that you mention a 35mm, I've just been looking at one!
          Best regards, Martyn.

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          • #6
            Yeah, the first time someone said "crop sensor" I was thinking "What?! What's that?" There is a lot to learn in the DSLR realm. Fortunately there are MANY resources for this.

            Also check out DSLR Shooter and DSLR Guide on YouTube for a lot of good info.


            Steve

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            • #7
              DSLR's are amazing, I looked at a wedding photo Jpeg shot with a canon 5D, the wedding couple were way off in the background focused behind a music group, I zoomed in and in on the couple until they were a mid shot and was amazed at how it was still a quality frame, all from a Jpeg image which was not even a large file, it just didn't seem possible!

              ''Also check out DSLR Shooter and DSLR Guide on YouTube for a lot of good info''. Thanks I'll check them out.
              Regards Martyn.

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