Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Between a rock and a hard place

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Between a rock and a hard place

    I need your guys input on this. I'm stuck between a rock and a hard place. For the most part, I usually fund everything myself because the cost is so small, it's not really a big deal. When it comes to asking for funding from the public ( ie, kickstarter, indiegogo), that gets me nervous. Even asking a friend if I can borrow $20 makes me uneasy. I don't know if it's a pride thing or just the feeling of being dependent on other people for money. When it comes to fundraising, that's a lot of money we're talking about.

    My next project I will be working on is another music video. This time, I want to go bigger and better. The whole works, professional film crew and all (not just friends/co-workers whom had no idea how a film crew works), and enter it to a couple of music video festivals. I know I can pull it off as the director as how I want it to look. My last music video was quite a challenge for me... I was the producer/executive producer/director/DoP/Camera operator/location manager/editor....pretty much a one-man-crew, with some assistance from friends. It was tiring and I wasn't able to make the video exactly the way I wanted, it was about 70% close to what I had envisioned.

    Honestly now, I have no idea where to start. Where do I find a producer and a film crew? How much is enough?
    Producer / Director / Photographer
    www.vtlithyouvong.com

  • #2
    You are going to have to get past the uneasy feelings about funding. Go to kickstarter or indigogo and get your funding. Just be sure you have everything in place to complete the project because once you take the money you are committed. There is a huge difference between asking people you know for money and kickstarter campaigns. For one your friends are being confronted by you and can feel like they were put on the spot. The people who donate funds on Kickstarter and Indiegogo went there to dontate funds. No one asked them to go there. There is no reason to feel bad about asking a person to go swimming when he went to the beach on his own.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mick Scarborough View Post
      The people who donate funds on Kickstarter and Indiegogo went there to dontate funds. No one asked them to go there. There is no reason to feel bad about asking a person to go swimming when he went to the beach on his own.
      Good point. I guess I was just overwhelmed and that didn't even cross my mind. It's the business aspect of it and that's what I lack. I guess I'll just go for it.
      Producer / Director / Photographer
      www.vtlithyouvong.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Let me offer a cautionary word, with the caveat that I haven't done an indiegogo/kickstarter campaign myself.
        I have, however, watched many other people do them - some (very) successfully and others completely unsuccessfully.

        Make sure you do all of your homework and legwork ahead of time, including a budget and production plan. Put together a terrific pitch video. Then be prepared to aggressively pursue all of your social media, email, and professional contacts. You'll need to keep putting up fresh material - new videos as well as new written material. And stay after people.

        It helps if you've supported other people in the past, whether it's by helping them with their projects or contributing financially.

        I've seen people start out well, and then fall flat. I've also seen others work nearly full time for a month or more on a campaign, fund it successfully, and then leverage it into other financial support.
        Screenwriter and script consultant: www.maralesemann.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mara View Post
          Let me offer a cautionary word, with the caveat that I haven't done an indiegogo/kickstarter campaign myself.
          I have, however, watched many other people do them - some (very) successfully and others completely unsuccessfully.

          Make sure you do all of your homework and legwork ahead of time, including a budget and production plan. Put together a terrific pitch video. Then be prepared to aggressively pursue all of your social media, email, and professional contacts. You'll need to keep putting up fresh material - new videos as well as new written material. And stay after people.

          It helps if you've supported other people in the past, whether it's by helping them with their projects or contributing financially.

          I've seen people start out well, and then fall flat. I've also seen others work nearly full time for a month or more on a campaign, fund it successfully, and then leverage it into other financial support.
          Thank you Mara for the advice. It definitely gives me a more clear view of what I will about to get myself into. Plan plan plan and keep following up on things. The pre production process, I know is the most difficult process. I will definitely do a lot of homework. This will be my first actual production where budget is involve. Gotta start somewhere right? Again, thanks for the insight Mara.
          Producer / Director / Photographer
          www.vtlithyouvong.com

          Comment

          Working...
          X