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Why a DSLR for video making?

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  • Why a DSLR for video making?

    For a long time, Iíve been looking to select a good camera for video making. My budget for this camera is between $1000 and $2000.

    It seems everyone is telling me a DSLR is the obvious choice... Why is that? Why would a DSLR be better than something like a Canon VIXIA HF G20 (for example)?

  • #2
    DOF, size, and image quality.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Dominic Donnelly View Post
      DOF, size, and image quality.
      Also in the price range, it is the only way you can get removable lenses.
      -AF

      sigpic

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Anonymous Filmmaker View Post
        Also in the price range, it is the only way you can get removable lenses.
        So if I wanted to buy "a DSLR" and only buy one Lens (that I'd use for multiple lighting situations), then does that mean I might as well go with something like the Canon VIXIA HF G20?

        Does Canon VIXIA HF G20 have manual focus, and manual control of how much light you let in?

        I know the Canon VIXIA HF G20 has 1080p... Can it shoot both 24fps and 29 or 30fps? Does it have a headphone terminal?

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        • #5
          The lens is decent, and seems to have fair manual controls. It can shoot 24 and 30fps. (30 in the codec AVCHD and 24 in MPEG4.) But a DSLR is a lot more future proof, especially if you change your mind about lenses in the future.
          -AF

          sigpic

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          • #6
            If you get Canon Dslr, then you can also install third party software "Magic Lantern" in order to use more features of your camera.

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            • #7
              Should you get a DSLR for video making ?

              A DSLR is not the best for film making but you might end up seriously regretting the Canon VIXIA HF G20 for that amount of money. I'm not in favor of DSLR cameras but with that budget, you can't really beat it in terms of image quality.

              Also, I notice that you mentioned that you were interested in video making which is different from film making. If you decide to go into video making and doing it for more of a hobby and wanted something that wasn't all that professional. then a camera like the Canon VIXIA HF G20 would be alright. But if you are making the purchase online, you might want to look at various DSLR cameras that still have better quality and you could get for a 1/3 of that price like NIKON D3100 but as mentioned above that would be for video making.

              if however you do decide to go into film with that budget you might want to consider picking a DSLR that shoots more than 1k resolution. At that budget you be able to get an outstanding camera that shoots in 2k resolution. Also, we are approaching a time where tape is becoming obsolete. If you do get a 3ccd type of camera which may have its advantages over DSLR with great image quality, I'd recommend going for one that records video to a card rather than tape, if possible.
              At that price range, you could find these tape cameras that shoot 2k resolution:

              HVX200

              Canon XL-H1

              you could still the DOF (depth of field) you get with DSLR lens if you just use your zoom function in a 3ccd camera.



              you could look up these cameras:

              canon 5d mark ii (used)
              panasonic gh2


              or, to shoot in 3.5 k, you could get ********

              canon 5d mark iii (used)


              Let me know if this helps you out. :D

              www . videoschool . net
              #BeWhatYouStudy
              Last edited by Vince The Producer; 01-21-2014, 03:24 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scott View Post
                For a long time, Iíve been looking to select a good camera for video making. My budget for this camera is between $1000 and $2000.

                It seems everyone is telling me a DSLR is the obvious choice... Why is that? Why would a DSLR be better than something like a Canon VIXIA HF G20 (for example)?
                I use a DSLR when I film. It's affordable and easy to use. Great for beginner film makers. Check out my youtube page:
                www.youtube.com/freemasonUSNavy

                "Bad Boy" music video was shot on a T2i and a 17mm lens. (first music video)
                "Lone Star Man" music video was shot on a 5D Mark lll and a 85mm lens with variable ND filter. (second music video)
                "Barstool Kinda Night" music video (currently in post production) was shot on a RED ONE cinema lens. (third music video)
                Producer / Director / Photographer
                www.vtlithyouvong.com

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                • #9
                  At that price range, for that type of camera, im pretty sure that camera comes with manual focus capabilities, manual control of how much light comes in, most definitely shoots in 24 fps, and has a head phone terminal. But at budget you could get cameras that look the same or pretty close in quality but a cheaper price

                  let me know if that helps you out.

                  www . videoschool . net
                  #BeWhatYouStudy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Anonymous Filmmaker View Post
                    The lens is decent, and seems to have fair manual controls. It can shoot 24 and 30fps. (30 in the codec AVCHD and 24 in MPEG4.) But a DSLR is a lot more future proof, especially if you change your mind about lenses in the future.
                    For me, the words “future proof” are the most powerful in convincing me to go with a DSLR.

                    But then again, the future is so difficult to predict, that you never know… I remember back around 2000 I heard a college film teacher talking about MiniDV, and how it was this new spectacular thing that was really going to last. One person told him technology quickly gets out of date. The professor assured him MiniDV tapes were something truly special that would look spectacular for many decades to come… But now, in 2014, if I show someone something that I shot with a 2000 MiniDV camera, they’re going to say it looks like a 1980s VHS camera. They'll say it looks like I used automatic focus and white balancing.

                    So my real question is this:

                    Why would you think it’s impossible that in less than 5 years everyone will own a TV at home meant for something shot on at least 16K - and anything you shoot now on a 1080p DSLR will ridiculously look old on their TV, regardless of the Lens you shoot with?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scott View Post
                      Why would you think itís impossible that in less than 5 years everyone will own a TV at home meant for something shot on at least 16K - and anything you shoot now on a 1080p DSLR will ridiculously look old on their TV, regardless of the Lens you shoot with?
                      Yes and no. I don't think it will happen that fast, I think in 5 years 4k and 1080 will both be accepted. And even in hundreds of years from now, the human eye can't tell the difference between 10000000000k and 1080 on a small enough screen, like a tablet or phone. But this will happen with any camera in your price range.
                      -AF

                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Well, I personally don’t own any iPhone or Smart Phone (never did)… I realize that eventually I’ll have to get one. But to me, ‘watching to appreciate the filmmaking’ is something that will always need to be done on a real monitor (something at least 20 inches).

                        After my Canon GL2 became “so old” so quickly, I am guessing that any 1080p DSLR or Canon VIXIA HF G20 will be as well.

                        But what I’m noticing is that DSLRs have this “rolling shutter” problem. And also, so few DSLRs can monitor audio that if I insist on monitoring my audio, my choices are pretty limited... These are the factors steering me away from DSLRs.

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                        • #13
                          Rolling shutter affects any cameras with cmos sensors, so many camcorders would have that problem as well.
                          -AF

                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            The best is to search on youtube "Canon HF G20 video" and then compare with "Panasonic GH3" :D

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                            • #15
                              The real question is, what is your primary use of this camera?

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