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Opinions of the Nikon D7100?

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  • Opinions of the Nikon D7100?

    For a while now Iíve been looking to buy a new DSLR camera, and Lens, to shoot videos with... While Iím aware itís recommended by all professionals that I get several different Lenses (for different options in different lighting situations), I personally choose to buy only one Lens - so I'd like to select one which can generally cover many lighting situations.

    After some research, Iím now 99% sure Iíve decided the Nikon D7100, along with the Lens in this kit, is for me
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...amera_kit.html

    But before I actually make the purchase, can anyone here tell me anything horrible about this camera or Lens that I should be aware of before buying? Thank you.

  • #2
    Which lens? It comes with two.
    -AF

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    • #3
      OkayÖ The truth is: Iím an idiot, I know virtually nothing about LensesÖ I simply decided thatís the camera for me. And when I asked for recommendations of a Lens, multiple people recommended that kit to me, so I blindly believed them without even bothering to look closely enough to notice there are actually two Lenses in it... Again, I am an idiot.

      I guess my real question is: If I were to buy that kit for shooting videos, can anyone here tell me anything horrible about that kit, which I should be aware of before buying?

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      • #4
        While there's nothing terrible, I think you could get a better deal if you "make a kit" yourself.


        Camera Body with some necessary accessories:
        $1,146.95

        Now choose a lens. There are two main things at this point you should be looking for in a lens. Here is an excerpt from the article I wrote about choosing a camera:
        The lens is one of the most important parts of the camera. The kit lens, or the lens that comes with the camera, is not always great. The two main factors in a lens are the f-stop, or aperture, and the focal length, or how much it is zoomed in. You may have a prime lens. That means that the lens doesn't zoom at all. The benefit is that you normally get a much better aperture. If you get a zoom lens, you can go between a number of focal lengths. A common kit zoom lens would be an 18-55 mm. These normally have much worse apertures. A good aperture would be a lower number. If you buy a camera body without a lens, you can buy a lens separately which would save you money if you just want that instead of the kit lens. When determining what focal length you want, keep in mind the crop factor of your camera. Just look up "(Camera name) crop factor." If you get a full frame camera, it does not have a crop.
        So to sum up, you want a high distance between the two numbers (eg 18-200mm) and a low number as the f-stop. (eg 1.8, although it is almost impossible to find a zoom lens with an f stop that low :D)





        -AF

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        • #5
          Someone just told me that all DSLRs are limited to 12 minutes of continuous recording. Is this true? If it is, that’s probably enough to make me start from scratch in figuring out the right camera for me, all over again.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Scott View Post
            Someone just told me that all DSLRs are limited to 12 minutes of continuous recording. Is this true? If it is, that’s probably enough to make me start from scratch in figuring out the right camera for me, all over again.
            No, but I think the legal max is around 40 min. It's kind of stupid really. There is a tax on camcorders. It only applies to cameras with a certain recording time over some number. Like I said, I think it's around 40 min. Different cameras do vary, and it also depends on storage.

            Edit:

            After writing this I was reading a little stuff online. Apparently the time limit is 29:59. I also read
            The only reason DSLRs don’t already shoot longer video is because camera manufacturers want to bypass the 5.6% duty applied to video cameras, and the time limit allows them to avoid being classified as such.


            There may be firmware hacks on some cameras to get rid of this limit.
            Last edited by Anonymous Filmmaker; 01-18-2014, 05:12 PM.
            -AF

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            • #7
              Okay. A limit of 29:59 is perfectly fine with me. Thanks.

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              • #8
                I also think I’ve noticed a new problem (for me) with the Nikon D7100. My vocabulary is very poor here, but I’ll try to explain it as best as I can:

                But the LCD screen appears to have no way to fold out, and be physically adjustable to different angles.

                So for example, lets say I was shooting video handheld while holding the camera as high up as my arms can stretch (pointing the camera horizontally) then I have absolutely no way to look at what I’m recording.

                Is this correct?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Scott View Post
                  I also think I’ve noticed a new problem (for me) with the Nikon D7100. My vocabulary is very poor here, but I’ll try to explain it as best as I can:

                  But the LCD screen appears to have no way to fold out, and be physically adjustable to different angles.

                  So for example, lets say I was shooting video handheld while holding the camera as high up as my arms can stretch (pointing the camera horizontally) then I have absolutely no way to look at what I’m recording.

                  Is this correct?
                  For this particular camera, yes.


                  Another thing you should be aware of is rolling shutter (aka the "jello effect.") This sort of skews your image on a fast pan, especially at a high focal length. While some cameras do a bit better or worse, all dslrs have it due to their sensor. Just thought I should let you know.

                  This article also says that in high quality that cameras max recording time is 20 min, but in lower quality 29:59. I highly recommend reading that article, but keep in mind with their tests that the lens makes a huge difference. For example in their rolling shutter tests, they were shooting on a low focal length so it was barely noticeable. Also, low light capabilites also depend on the lens. Here is an example of higher rolling shutter (from some other camera.) Watch the cmos one, as that is the type of sensor in your camera: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TGKFdrY9aw
                  -AF

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                  • #10
                    I’m not happy about the rolling shutter or the non-movable LCD. But it still seems like the Nikon D7100 is the only choice for me, because all cameras from Canon (of this basic quality & price range) have no way of monitoring audio. To me, it’s just plain old stupid to record any audio that you can’t monitor….

                    But can you recommend another DSLR I should look at (from any company) with which I can monitor audio?

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                    • #11
                      The only one I know of is the Panasonic GH3 (and probably others in the gh series.) If you are buying that instead I would wait for the new model, the GH4k that shoots in 4k. The price should be under 2000 for I think body only. And I do want to point out that as much as I love my Sony A57, while that has a headphone output, there is no live monitoring. Oh well.
                      -AF

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                      • #12
                        I appreciate your input. But I personally am not concerned with 4K or even 2K. I'm satisfied with 1080p.

                        Also, when I say my price range is "between $1000 and $2000" that includes accessories... For example, I can't spend $2000 on a camera body, and then spend more money on Lenses, and multiple other accessories.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Scott View Post
                          I appreciate your input. But I personally am not concerned with 4K or even 2K. I'm satisfied with 1080p.

                          Also, when I say my price range is "between $1000 and $2000" that includes accessories... For example, I can't spend $2000 on a camera body, and then spend more money on Lenses, and multiple other accessories.
                          Alright, that's fine. But I think the GH3 is pretty cheap now, and will get cheaper after the GH4k is officially released.
                          -AF

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