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fixing over saturated skin tones

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  • fixing over saturated skin tones

    I am editing a video and one of my shooters came back with highly saturated clips. I can not avoid using them but i am having trouble making them look even remotely better. whenever i find a solution to bring back the correct skin tone i wind up washing the picture out. i was wondering if anyone has a solution to this?
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  • #2
    If that's the piece, in FCP I think that would be hard to fix. Her skin tone and the flooring is extremely similar.

    If you have Final Cut Pro, you can try the Color Corrector using the tool that picks out a single color. It's time consuming and the end game is iffy. The problem I see (and I suck at this. So, my word should be last) is the colors are too close to pick it out.

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    • #3
      Like I tell my clients--Sometimes ya just can't fix it. Software is amazing, but it can't fix everything...especially when it's not in the budget. Too often I have to explain that I CAN fix it--but not in the budget they've set. "Fixing it in post" isn't an actual viable solution in reality. It's a joke we use on set when we know we need to take extra time to solve a problem. It's a punchline, not a solution.

      You could use masks to isolate the skin tone, correct and animate the masks, but that's probably out of range of the budget since its massively time consuming. It looks really, really red to me...I thought that was on purpose.


      Kurt Hathaway
      -------------------
      VikingDream7 Productions
      Video Production & Editing

      khathawayart[at]gmail.com

      www.cartoon-balloons.com

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      • #4
        Originally posted by khathawayart View Post
        Like I tell my clients--Sometimes ya just can't fix it. Software is amazing, but it can't fix everything...especially when it's not in the budget. Too often I have to explain that I CAN fix it--but not in the budget they've set. "Fixing it in post" isn't an actual viable solution in reality. It's a joke we use on set when we know we need to take extra time to solve a problem. It's a punchline, not a solution.

        You could use masks to isolate the skin tone, correct and animate the masks, but that's probably out of range of the budget since its massively time consuming. It looks really, really red to me...I thought that was on purpose.


        Kurt Hathaway
        -------------------
        VikingDream7 Productions
        Video Production & Editing

        khathawayart[at]gmail.com

        www.cartoon-balloons.com
        While you're not literally doing it, are you saying you digitally paint over the skin? If that's what it is, do you do it frame by frame? That would be a pain in the ass.

        Honestly, I don't think that frame looks bad the way it is. Sometimes I think people worry about many things, when the only people who notice are the filmmakers and people who want to be film makers. The vast majority of viewers accept what you show as is.

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        • #5
          Not painting, no. You'd duplicate the clip layer and put it on top of the same clip's bottom layer. Then use the masking tool to isolate the skin tone areas--face arms, etc. Color correct those areas as desired. Then as the actor moves, you'd have to animate the mask outlines frame by frame to follow the actor's face, arms, etc. Could be done in FCP or Premiere, I think--but it's better in After Effects. And -- yes, it's a huge pain in the ass.

          I had a situation where a character had to handle some photos--and the pix were in color--but in the story they were from a BW security camera. So I had to do pretty much the same thing as above with the photos to make them BW. A single shot took me hours. But I made the client pay for it. This was a classic case of fixing it in post--one that was actually possible--with time and effort. The on-set photos should have been BW, but no one was paying attention on set--and I wasn't there to notice the gaffe.

          Kurt Hathaway
          -------------------
          VikingDream7 Productions
          Video Production & Editing

          khathawayart[at]gmail.com

          www.cartoon-balloons.com

          Comment


          • #6
            That's what I thought. I'd never have the patience.

            I'm excellent at planning. There isn't a thing I've ever overlooked when shooting. Nothing has ever come up that I didn't have contingency plans for. So those pictures would have been B/W.

            When I watched Sunset Blvd I loved the opening shot of Holden in the pool the camera looking up at the police. It looked great but strange. It turns out they put a mirror at the bottom of the pool and shot that while keeping the camera on the deck. Such imaginative and brilliant film making.

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            • #7
              Haven't seen SB since film school, I think. Gotta see that one again.

              Kurt Hathaway
              -------------------
              VikingDream7 Productions
              Video Production & Editing

              khathawayart[at]gmail.com

              www.cartoon-balloons.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Swanson is BRILLIANT.

                I grew up loving classic cinema. So, Swanson is up there with Davis, Crawford, Lombard... In one of the special features the girl in SB thought she was the star because she had no idea who Gloria Swanson was. Her mother set her straight. I can't imagine how awful it must be to have the public bow at your feet during your youth, only to forget you in your twilight years.

                Scene for scene movies made in the classic age are the epitome of storytelling. There isn't a wasted moment.

                In my top five of favorite movies is Mr Deeds Goes to Town, the Capra classic starring Gary Cooper and the love of my life Jean Arthur. I knew the Sandler remake was going to suck, I wanted to see the interpretation. I firmly believe that everyone that worked on Mr. Deeds are going to spend an eternity being beat by their counterparts of the magnificent original.

                I believe Hollywood needs to look back to gain a new audience. Good storytelling never goes out of style.

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                • #9
                  I, too--am a sucker for Jean Arthur. Discovered her in the 70's--probably in a Capra production. Just saw her in "Arizona" couple weeks back--then stumbled upon her in "Only Angels Have Wings" with another favorite of mine--Cary Grant. Plus: it's a Hawks production...can't go wrong. 1939 was an amazing year in cinema history.

                  K

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                  • #10
                    If you haven't read the bio on Arthur it's great. Sad but great. She was not a happy camper.

                    The thing I'll never forget (I think I still have the pages) when she passed away, the NY Post had a two page spread. Cageny I'm pretty sure made the front page. But, she had a larger interior spread. Film lovers know how she rates.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by UniqueAmI View Post

                      Honestly, I don't think that frame looks bad the way it is.
                      Yep, wasn't the idea to have a pink chick in a pink room living in a pink world? I believe that was the idea. Why else was everything pink to begin with? You love pink.

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