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Premiere Pro Best Video Format for Editing??

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  • Premiere Pro Best Video Format for Editing??

    I have a question for Adobe Premiere Pro.

    I use this editing software a lot but I'm not sure if I'm using it correctly to make my life easier in editing videos in general.

    When I import my videos, Premiere takes a while to scrub through the videos and stuff like that and even when rendered, it gets choppy at times. I know it's not my computer specs because I have a good computer with 8GB RAM, Quad Core Processor, and NVIDIA GeForce 650 GTX.

    I did find out that the video format that gets imported in the software does matter and affect the speed of the editing process. I use MPEG stream clip and I do not know what format to switch my raw footage into when importing my footage into Premiere. If you guys can help me out with this, that'll be awesome.
    Thanks.

    Best Answer:
    Originally posted by khathawayart View Post
    I used to have PP, but never did much other than play with it a bit.

    But I think it's quite a bit like Final Cut which I use all the time.

    Yeah, the format is important and can speed up your process a lot.

    I also use MPEG streamclip a lot and I know that your PP project specs should match the MPEG-S specs to make the footage work smoother.

    You can do this two ways:

    Match your Mpeg-S specs to match the PP specs you want to use...or Match your PP specs to the MPEG-S specs [all Mpeg-S files should be consistent]. I'd go with the first.

    For instance, I use the NTSC widescreen specs in my Final Cut projects. 29.9 fps, 854 by 480 [16:9], interlaced, standard definition {I use thse since I go to DVD most of the time}. In final cut, it's one of the pop-up options....it's not a custom setting.

    So first: settle on a setting in PP that works for your project....or create a custom one, if needed. Make a note of the specs...frame rate, SD or HD, pixel area, etc. Then use the same specs when converting your clips with Mpeg-Streamclip.

    When I'm converting clips that I plan on using in those projects, I output the same specs from Mpeg-S so that they match and no rendering is needed when I import the clips to FCP. You can set up all those specs in Mpeg Streamclip before converting. I export as a QuickTime .mov file. Usually with a H.264 codec....or the Apple Pro Res 222.

    Depending on where my clips come from, they may be in a 4:3 format--so there's some math I need to use to get it to fit a 16:9 area without stretching the image.

    You may want to play around with different codes by doing some tests first and settle on a codec that seems to work best in your workflow.

    Any questions, feel free to contact me directly.



    Kurt Hathaway
    -------------------
    VikingDream7 Productions
    Video Production & Editing

    khathawayart[at]gmail.com

  • #2
    Have you tried bringing the viewing quality down while you're editing?
    -AF

    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      I used to have PP, but never did much other than play with it a bit.

      But I think it's quite a bit like Final Cut which I use all the time.

      Yeah, the format is important and can speed up your process a lot.

      I also use MPEG streamclip a lot and I know that your PP project specs should match the MPEG-S specs to make the footage work smoother.

      You can do this two ways:

      Match your Mpeg-S specs to match the PP specs you want to use...or Match your PP specs to the MPEG-S specs [all Mpeg-S files should be consistent]. I'd go with the first.

      For instance, I use the NTSC widescreen specs in my Final Cut projects. 29.9 fps, 854 by 480 [16:9], interlaced, standard definition {I use thse since I go to DVD most of the time}. In final cut, it's one of the pop-up options....it's not a custom setting.

      So first: settle on a setting in PP that works for your project....or create a custom one, if needed. Make a note of the specs...frame rate, SD or HD, pixel area, etc. Then use the same specs when converting your clips with Mpeg-Streamclip.

      When I'm converting clips that I plan on using in those projects, I output the same specs from Mpeg-S so that they match and no rendering is needed when I import the clips to FCP. You can set up all those specs in Mpeg Streamclip before converting. I export as a QuickTime .mov file. Usually with a H.264 codec....or the Apple Pro Res 222.

      Depending on where my clips come from, they may be in a 4:3 format--so there's some math I need to use to get it to fit a 16:9 area without stretching the image.

      You may want to play around with different codes by doing some tests first and settle on a codec that seems to work best in your workflow.

      Any questions, feel free to contact me directly.



      Kurt Hathaway
      -------------------
      VikingDream7 Productions
      Video Production & Editing

      khathawayart[at]gmail.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I export H.264 as well.
        -AF

        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Did that advice help? I know it's a headful of info, but I had to learn the hard way, too.


          Kurt Hathaway
          -------------------
          VikingDream7 Productions
          Video Production & Editing

          khathawayart[at]gmail.com

          Comment

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