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How should I distribute my film, considering I'm a kid?

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  • How should I distribute my film, considering I'm a kid?

    I've heard there are ways to get your feature indies on Netflix, Hulu Plus, etc. but I would highly expect that they have some sort of rule regarding the age you have to be to submit a film for distribution. And that makes sense of course. But considering me and my friend are dropping $1000 on this film, we need to make enough money off of it to pay that back, otherwise we're loosing money.

    Is there anywhere else I can submit an indie and make money off of it?

  • #2
    Short or feature?
    Last edited by Anonymous Filmmaker; 03-30-2014, 11:54 AM. Reason: Fixed error
    -AF

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Anonymous Filmmaker View Post
      Short or feature?
      A feature.

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      • #4
        I'm no expert in distribution, but check out the vimeo pay per view plan. You do the advertising with social media type stuff, and anyone can pay to watch.
        -AF

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        • #5
          It also needs to be marketable...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MakefilmsOrDie View Post
            It also needs to be marketable...
            uh, yeah, not cool, man.

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            • #7
              I'm only a kid too. I haven't really made any films to sell but I hear Vimeo pay per view thingy is good and Vimeo has a tip jar thing but your video has to be good to get tips. Also you have to pay for them (get a pro or plus account) and you might not make a profit so it could be tough to get your money back.

              You could burn the DVD's yourself and sell them. Just have to buy some blank DVD's and maybe a DVD burner. People in your are will like films that are made locally even if they aren't that good.

              If your only just starting out I would suggest that you just stick it on Vimeo, Youtube whatever and just get followers and a fanbase. Then try and sell videos and stuff.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bryce Welsh View Post
                uh, yeah, not cool, man.
                I disagree. There's validity in Dave's point.

                I recommend you talk to a parent or guardian and get them to do the process of submitting.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Littlemonkey View Post
                  I'm only a kid too. I haven't really made any films to sell but I hear Vimeo pay per view thingy is good and Vimeo has a tip jar thing but your video has to be good to get tips. Also you have to pay for them (get a pro or plus account) and you might not make a profit so it could be tough to get your money back.

                  You could burn the DVD's yourself and sell them. Just have to buy some blank DVD's and maybe a DVD burner. People in your are will like films that are made locally even if they aren't that good.

                  If your only just starting out I would suggest that you just stick it on Vimeo, Youtube whatever and just get followers and a fanbase. Then try and sell videos and stuff.
                  In the past I have burnt my DVD's and sold them locally, but for this project I'd like to reach a large audience, because of all the time and money I'm putting into it.

                  Do you no how much the fine is for the Vimeo thing?

                  Thanks for the tips, man.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dominic Donnelly View Post
                    I disagree. There's validity in Dave's point..
                    Well yes, it's true that the film needs to be high-quality enough to be marketable, but obviously I know that already, so why say it? That's just being mean.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bryce Welsh View Post
                      Do you no how much the fine is for the Vimeo thing?
                      I'm not sure in American dollars but it's £20 a week for a pro account which you get vimeo on demand with and you split the money with vimeo. For the tip jar you only need vimeo plus which is£5 a week but its smaller amounts.

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                      • #12
                        Also if you just join Vimeo you can upgrade from a basic - free - account to a pro/plus and it'll tell you how much a year or week they'll cost

                        Edit:
                        Sorry I was talking rubbish when I said £20 a pro account is $200 a year and a plus account is $60 so I don't know what \i was looking at
                        Last edited by Littlemonkey; 04-02-2014, 08:11 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bryce Welsh View Post
                          Well yes, it's true that the film needs to be high-quality enough to be marketable, but obviously I know that already, so why say it? That's just being mean.
                          I was not referring to quality at all, I was actually referring to content. The content needs to be marketable. There was nothing mean intended by my post. You could tell the greatest story in the world but if a company doesn't find the content marketable then they have no reason to take a chance on losing money. I've seen ridiculously low quality films on Netflix, that were sold because at the very least, they told a complete story. Well good enough to get people to watch it anyway. Best of luck to you.
                          Last edited by MakefilmsOrDie; 04-02-2014, 09:22 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bryce Welsh View Post
                            Well yes, it's true that the film needs to be high-quality enough to be marketable, but obviously I know that already, so why say it? That's just being mean.
                            There have been many films that have been of great quality, yet not marketable. Throughout history, artists we now consider geniuses and masterminds have died with not a piece of work sold. I'm not judging the quality of your film, but defending Dave's point about the marketability of the content. Oh, and develop a thick skin. Ignore those that attack you, but broad questions and criticism are going to come your way as an artist Telling someone that what they're saying is [insert annoyed reply here], is fine, but if they're giving sincere and rage less criticism or advice to help you or display their thoughts on a plan or finished project. And no, I don't think we should be able to assume you 'obviously know that already'. Knowing the marketability of content is something that an unfortunately large majority filmmakers overlook, it's a bit more complex than "my genre has an audience and this is the group I am appealing to". So if you know the marketability of your film, and a good marketing plan for the high quality film you plan to make, that's wonderful, but assumption about a person's knowledge of you and proceeding to say things about them or their statements seems unnecessary. But even then, I'm going to argue quality is an important thing to keep in mind as well. Look at films on Netflix and Hulu, and think about if you REALLY want to compete with the films you see.

                            My recommendations for you to distribute your film are to go the Vimeo route, and buy a yearly $200 plan. You could also allow streaming or downloading from the site if you have or will create one for the film. Perhaps that, with maybe a small DVD run, then release it up on Youtube. Honestly, making a first feature, you may want to due it purely to get recognized and seen to build up a fan base. Sometimes distribution isn't just for money, but getting people to view your work. That way, when you make another film, you will have a much larger fan base that will watch your next film. Considering you're a kid, building an audience may be a better goal than trying to earn money.

                            I'm just try to help. GL with your film.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MakefilmsOrDie View Post
                              I was not referring to quality at all, I was actually referring to content. The content needs to be marketable. There was nothing mean intended by my post. You could tell the greatest story in the world but if a company doesn't find the content marketable then they have no reason to take a chance on losing money. I've seen ridiculously low quality films on Netflix, that were sold because at the very least, they told a complete story. Well good enough to get people to watch it anyway. Best of luck to you.
                              Okay, sorry about that. I misunderstood you.

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