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Looking for a short film to practice sfx / composing on

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  • No Pay Job Looking for a short film to practice sfx / composing on

    Hi!

    I'm a music technology student from Finland and we were given a task to create a soundtrack for a short film. We are supposed to record foley sounds, compose and record original music and effects. I'm asking if someone has a short film (~4 minutes) and is willing to share it with me so I can practice with it. Only people who'll see it is me and my teacher. If you're interested or have a question, send me a message here or to my email jpk.nissinen[at]gmail.com.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    I tried this once before a few months back...barring any sort of reluctance to give their clips away (despite it being a collaborative effort of sorts/ completely non-profit), I get the feeling a lot filmmakers are hesitant to use composers. Whether it is a time constraint, as this process does occur mostly post production, or a fundamental misunderstanding of the importance of an original score, I feel it is a missed opportunity~

    I mean, who wouldn't want to explore this? If you have any sort of material us composers can use to create a temp track, at the very least we would return something to you scored. This rubber banding of ideas so speak can jump start and inspire a filmmaker also re-evaluate how they shoot and edit, again refining the film making process.

    Just a thought. Some of the finest films made coincidentally have some of the finest music written...

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    • #3
      Indeed. I guess some film makers are possessive about their work and not willing to share it to strangers on the internet, or have had enough bad experiences with collaboration online. I spoke to a friend today who makes films/commercials for living, according to him every time they buy a "stock songs" for their work it never quite fits. Since they don't have a composer in the house that's what they have to do.

      Not sure how amateur film makers approach music: is it more like a necessity that can be added last or some sort of unknown territory... And from what I've seen here there are a lot of us composers and sound engineers willing to work (for free!).

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      • #4
        Well, amateur filmmakers simply have a lot on their plate. Personally, the score is one of the most overlooked aspects of films now a days. Back when there wasn't special effects and 3D films, the use of the score had more of an impact with the audience, as there was just simply less to become overwhelmed by. This is why scores 20, 30, 40 years contain much more melody, and less wall of sound (Hans Zimmer).

        Perhaps filmmakers believe that an orchestra is boring, and doesn't have the "umph" that an electronic or rock and roll genre might provide. Bottom line is unless the production has a horseshoe up its ass, the likelihood of stock music supporting a short film or feature length (stock music with feature length is suicide!) is next to zero, dramatically speaking. Stock music should be used for commercials, DVD menu screens, and themepark ride queue lines.

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        • #5
          Heres some food for thought though, whenever I cannot find something to score, I re-write/ update a piece of music that all ready exists. So find an inferior version of something and give it a face lift. It will actually help refine how you write your own stuff!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CJM Sandman View Post
            Heres some food for thought though, whenever I cannot find something to score, I re-write/ update a piece of music that all ready exists. So find an inferior version of something and give it a face lift. It will actually help refine how you write your own stuff!
            Thanks for the idea, however this project requires the picture as well as the sound... :)

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            • #7
              "the likelihood of stock music supporting a short film or feature length (stock music with feature length is suicide!) is next to zero"

              I think you are referring to stock music scoring an entire film? But on the other hand, I've had my stock music used in short scenes of three different feature length films. Two are running on Netflix now after being in theaters , and one is slated for theater release later this year. For the two I've seen, the stock music cues were used as source music, not score. So I would say that yes, stock music can have a place in all types of film.
              Last edited by Studio Nine; 10-05-2016, 08:08 AM.
              pond5.com/artist/Studio_Nine_Productions

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              • #8
                Oh of course! I hope it doesn't sound like I'm bashing stock music (I am a composer so my opinion will differ slightly), but yes stock music in used sparsely for a short scene or montage is completely fine. I guess what I meant was most stock music is pretty generalized, it typically kind of washes over a scene for the most part. It would be difficult to mickey mouse stock music into something longer than lets say, 5-6 minutes. There is simply too much editing and sync points to acknowledge honestly. The editing of the music starts to sound clearly unoriginal.

                I have seen projects that have used stock music all the way through...and gosh it's a train wreck. You can wave goodbye to the seamless cohesion of any leitmotif that should exist with a character.

                So yes used like a spice, perfect. Feature length starts to get really dicey.

                I will throw some bones out though to directors that do this and somehow maintained a good/great film. Stanley Kubrick would famously piece together classical works as he despised using composers for some reason. Quentin Tarantino also hates using composers and usually pieces together popular music to his films. Martin Scorsese is another that comes to mind, you never get the full sense there is actually a score in his films, but his particular style lends itself to this sort of musical choice perhaps.

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