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patmiller75
08-23-2017, 01:43 PM
Hello everyone,

I am a videographer and filmmaker from southern California. I am reaching out to talk about music rights for a short film I recently finished. It's a zero budget, non-profit short film that I have made entirely on my own. Currently, it has only been shown privately to friends and family, but am hoping to make it public and submit it into film festivals.

I have used copyrighted mainstream music in the film, and the songs were extremely carefully chosen and play an integral part of the film.

Here is my dilemma: I have done the proper research regarding obtaining synch and master licenses via ASCAP and the songs' publishers. I found the contact information for the publishers and song writers via ASCAP and reached out to each one over a week ago, but I have heard nothing back. I sent the request to about 10 different email addresses, and even filled out forms from the webpages of specific music labels. Still, a week later, I've got nothing back.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what I could try next? I already have considered the option of re-scoring the film, but I would like to first attempt to get clearances for the music. It's a non-profit film, and I am only planning to submit it to a few local festivals.
Thank you.

About the film:
This was a 2 year side project for me with zero budget. I practice videography for part-time work, so I was able to use some of my existing camera gear. I've been filming skiing and snowboarding for over a decade, and I wanted to create something unique and non-traditional with this film. A good friend of mine helped me write the script, and I did all the filming, directing, editing, sound design, and color grading. The purpose of this film is to tell a story in a new impressionistic manner, and to gain exposure for my cinematography and film-making techniques.

Demi 31
09-26-2017, 08:22 AM
Hello everyone,

I am a videographer and filmmaker from southern California. I am reaching out to talk about music rights for a short film I recently finished. It's a zero budget, non-profit short film that I have made entirely on my own. Currently, it has only been shown privately to friends and family, but am hoping to make it public and submit it into film festivals.

I have used copyrighted mainstream music in the film, and the songs were extremely carefully chosen and play an integral part of the film.

Here is my dilemma: I have done the proper research regarding obtaining synch and master licenses via ASCAP and the songs' publishers. I found the contact information for the publishers and song writers via ASCAP and reached out to each one over a week ago, but I have heard nothing back. I sent the request to about 10 different email addresses, and even filled out forms from the webpages of specific music labels. Still, a week later, I've got nothing back.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what I could try next? I already have considered the option of re-scoring the film, but I would like to first attempt to get clearances for the music. It's a non-profit film, and I am only planning to submit it to a few local festivals.
Thank you.

About the film:
This was a 2 year side project for me with zero budget. I practice videography for part-time work, so I was able to use some of my existing camera gear. I've been filming skiing and snowboarding for over a decade, and I wanted to create something unique and non-traditional with this film. A good friend of mine helped me write the script, and I did all the filming, directing, editing, sound design, and color grading. The purpose of this film is to tell a story in a new impressionistic manner, and to gain exposure for my cinematography and film-making techniques.

Why not just get a CC license from them? I mean there are different types of CC licenses out there, each of which grants the world and all people in it a certain latitude in using the licensed work, but also reserves certain rights or control. I mean according to this https://www.1and1.co.uk/digitalguide/websites/digital-law/how-to-use-creative-commons-correctly/ the license tries to do the best for both worlds because it's a license which gives anyone who wants to use your work permission to use it for specific purposes. Though it would be nice if someone else gave us more information if this license is applicable to your case or not??

strejos
09-26-2017, 09:38 AM
Hello everyone,

I am a videographer and filmmaker from southern California. I am reaching out to talk about music rights for a short film I recently finished. It's a zero budget, non-profit short film that I have made entirely on my own. Currently, it has only been shown privately to friends and family, but am hoping to make it public and submit it into film festivals.

I have used copyrighted mainstream music in the film, and the songs were extremely carefully chosen and play an integral part of the film.

Here is my dilemma: I have done the proper research regarding obtaining synch and master licenses via ASCAP and the songs' publishers. I found the contact information for the publishers and song writers via ASCAP and reached out to each one over a week ago, but I have heard nothing back. I sent the request to about 10 different email addresses, and even filled out forms from the webpages of specific music labels. Still, a week later, I've got nothing back.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what I could try next? I already have considered the option of re-scoring the film, but I would like to first attempt to get clearances for the music. It's a non-profit film, and I am only planning to submit it to a few local festivals.
Thank you.

About the film:
This was a 2 year side project for me with zero budget. I practice videography for part-time work, so I was able to use some of my existing camera gear. I've been filming skiing and snowboarding for over a decade, and I wanted to create something unique and non-traditional with this film. A good friend of mine helped me write the script, and I did all the filming, directing, editing, sound design, and color grading. The purpose of this film is to tell a story in a new impressionistic manner, and to gain exposure for my cinematography and film-making techniques.


These guys have some really helpful resources, on how to go about music and film clearance:

wilkinsonmazzeo.com/resources/category/artists/

ehrenebbage
11-02-2017, 04:20 AM
Music clearance can be a huge challenge. It is a significant part of a music supervisor's role on a project and it can take a long time to sort out, even for highly experienced and connected professionals. Basically, you need to track down every writer (or their rep), publisher, and label associated with each song, and negotiate a sync fee for use. There might be several writers and publishers on any given pop track, and they all need to give their approval.

You could try contacting the songwriters directly. Try a call or an email that says "I'd like a sync license for a film project, and I'm wondering who represents X song for sync." Hopefully one of the writers will respond with helpful info.

Unfortunately, it's highly unlikely that you will get mainstream songs for little or no money. If you sent labels and publishers a request for a free license, your emails were probably trashed.

I'd suggest you contact a few music libraries like Marmoset, Musicbed, Premiumbeat, etc. Send them your list of songs and explain that you are needing to replace them with tracks that have a similar feel. Ask them to send you a playlist with a few options for each tune. You may wind up with your choice of 6 or 8 good alternatives for each of the songs in your project, and the licensing process is easy and much, much, much more affordable : ) They can issue a low-cost film festival license for now...if your film is picked up by a distributor you can go back and get the appropriate license and the process should be fairly seamless.

Good luck!