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UniqueAmI
06-12-2012, 12:03 AM
As I read a few of the other threads here, it seems some people are having a hard time finding businesses or investors. One person wrote about tax right-offs, which I know a few people who have approached individuals in this sense with success. But, since the investor wanted to lose money for a write-off, they made sure the projects failed. But, it was a learning experience for the artists.

I've always had bad luck with money. So, I seriously know nothing. Everything I've ever done I've self funded. So, I go the no/micro-micro budget route.

Theoretically isn't any successful business or individual (rich person) a candidate?

If this is true, couldn't you just drive around industrial areas making a list of businesses? If there's a theater or arts foundation, get a copy of their playbill and go through their donors.

I guess I'm saying finding businesses/individuals in an area with money isn't extremely difficult. Of course 99.9% probably aren't interested in investing in a movie. But, it can't hurt to ask and be rejected.

My question is: How do you approach them?

I'm currently rewriting a script that (if ever made) will show off a lot of New Jersey's beauty. I know what you're thinking, NJ's beauty? I'm a New Yorker and when I moved here in 99, I was ashamed of living in Jersey and ridiculed by family and friends. (sorry if you're from Jersey). But, I've found so many beautiful and unique places in Jersey, I wanted to do something to incorporate this varied state.

To try to do this guerilla style would be impossible. Many of the sites I'd love to shoot would kick us off in an instant.

Somehow I get Springsteen or Bon Jovi's address (you know what I mean), what do I write?

Nick Soares
06-12-2012, 09:45 AM
I have something for you. Send me a message tomorrow to remind me to give it to you

shadowman
06-13-2012, 02:30 PM
It's strange...

Packaging an indie feature can be the worst circle of frustration on the planet. You need money to attract talent, but you need talent to attract a financier or a distributor for pre-sales or advances. Most name actors or directors these days don't sign letters-of-intent (LOI), so it makes it difficult for a small film to get talent without the money in place already.

So packaging a film should be done almost like baking a cake --- a really fragile, complex, expensive cake that could evaporate into thin air with a simple hot breath. Private investors tend to be the way to go, and you will probably need to obtain several of them. Film investment companies and venture capitalist groups won't even give you the time of day without a full package and business plan, so stick to private people with some extra cash.

Also, be very careful the way you approach them. Technically, you should be registering with the SEC under the Title 4 Act that protects investors from fraudulent ventures and the shady people who pitch them. But if you are going after people that you know already, then I believe the registration can be avoided.

Finally, make sure you have a lawyer or legal acquaintance ready on hand. If you do manage to secure investors, they will want a contract drafted to make sure all parties involved are protected and compensated through fair and clear legal language on paper. Some attorneys will even do this pro bono.

I know this sounds like a handful, but once you start doing it enough, it becomes second nature. Indie producers learn how to make films the hard way.

UniqueAmI
06-14-2012, 11:19 AM
It's strange...

Packaging an indie feature can be the worst circle of frustration on the planet. You need money to attract talent, but you need talent to attract a financier or a distributor for pre-sales or advances. Most name actors or directors these days don't sign letters-of-intent (LOI), so it makes it difficult for a small film to get talent without the money in place already.

So packaging a film should be done almost like baking a cake --- a really fragile, complex, expensive cake that could evaporate into thin air with a simple hot breath. Private investors tend to be the way to go, and you will probably need to obtain several of them. Film investment companies and venture capitalist groups won't even give you the time of day without a full package and business plan, so stick to private people with some extra cash.

Also, be very careful the way you approach them. Technically, you should be registering with the SEC under the Title 4 Act that protects investors from fraudulent ventures and the shady people who pitch them. But if you are going after people that you know already, then I believe the registration can be avoided.

Finally, make sure you have a lawyer or legal acquaintance ready on hand. If you do manage to secure investors, they will want a contract drafted to make sure all parties involved are protected and compensated through fair and clear legal language on paper. Some attorneys will even do this pro bono.

I know this sounds like a handful, but once you start doing it enough, it becomes second nature. Indie producers learn how to make films the hard way.

I would love to work with some established or up and coming names. But, thankfully I've been blessed from a very young age to spot talent. So, finding actors isn't really a problem. It's getting everything together so we don't have to skimp on everything else.

This project I just dropped, I wrote this so it could be shot quick and with minimum locations. But, I knew from the get go that the locations were going to be small. So, right there it minimizes the ability to get a true feeling for the space. One wide shot, two medium, and two close-ups. There's not much you can do when there's no room to move the camera.

Rooms too small to really be able to get proper lighting.

Getting a proper crew who know their stuff and shoot more then on weekends.

These are the type of problems money would help eliminate for me.

I only know paupers, so asking any rich person is out for right now. But, once I know how to approach them, I'll work the details out. Then I'll be good to go. It's all a long way off.