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MrJay10
08-06-2013, 07:16 AM
So I shot one scene with 3 actors (one is the main bad guy) but the other 2, after watching everything back in the editing room just really don't blend or add to the movie like I anticipated. I am planning on cutting out the scene entirely and re-working the narrative. Another problem I had with the scene is the lighting was all over the place. That was also a frustrating day where none of my crew could make it so it was really me and a couple other people doing everything and it showed on camera because the quality was way down compared to the other scenes.

How do I go about explaining to actors that their scene got cut? I feel bad about it, but at the end of the day it's all about the movie, not tending to people's feelings. (even though I can go about it in a nice way)

Any suggestions on how I should handle this?

Vance Baryn
08-06-2013, 08:05 AM
There are tons of stories in very big blockbuster productions even where people only find out their scene is cut when they show up to the premiere and see that they're not in the movie!

But I wouldn't particularly advocate this approach :-)

If they're good actors, offering them another role somewhere else in the film might be good. If that's not feasible, just straight out tell them. There's nothing else you can do. But don't do it until the final edit has been made. I think it would be a bit premature before then.

UniqueAmI
08-06-2013, 08:08 AM
To be blunt: It's none of their business.

If it comes up, just explain it didn't play the way you wanted so you changed it. Actors have no control what happens after they perform.

What you can do is edit the scene and in the end, give them a copy for their reel or whatever.

Also, you'll find that most actors won't remember most of what they did. So, they might not even notice.

As for lighting, if you check out my Auditions Scene thread. Every different angle the lighting was completely different, and I had to color correct so they blended as best as possible. If the scenes work, the audience won't notice.

It's something when people agree to show up and help and then don't.

mara
08-06-2013, 08:09 AM
Probably the most famous example of a (then unknown) actor being entirely cut from a movie is Kevin Costner, who played the guy who committed suicide in "The Big Chill." In the final version, you never see the guy. So it happens.

Be nice, apologize but don't grovel, and explain that the scene just didn't work in the movie. And as Vance said, if the person is a good actor, and it works for the movie, consider using them somewhere else.

Vance Baryn
08-06-2013, 10:17 AM
To be blunt: It's none of their business.

If it comes up, just explain it didn't play the way you wanted so you changed it. Actors have no control what happens after they perform.

What you can do is edit the scene and in the end, give them a copy for their reel or whatever.


It depends... If you have paid them for their work then yes, it's none of their business. If they are unpaid and their "payment" is a credit and something for their reels then it becomes their business! If this latter situation is the case, I can see why MrJay would be a bit upset about having to cut them out of the movie after they showed up and worked for nothing. In the end, though you have to do what's best for the film.

MrJay10
08-06-2013, 10:53 AM
Thanks for the tips guys. I think what I'll probably do is a little after we're all done shooting, I'll send those 2 actors an honest email and apologize.

If I have time I'll edit their scene and send it to them so they can use it in their reel though.

On a sidenote, I was reading about how Terrence Mallick does this to everyone lol. I read he entirely cut out mickey rourke on the thin red line after rourke thought it was the best performance he'd ever given. That would suck.

UniqueAmI
08-06-2013, 11:28 AM
. In the end, though you have to do what's best for the film.

That's the only thing that matters, making the best movie possible. You can care about people's feelings etc, but they're not as important as the end product.

If they worked for free for credit, then an edited scene for their reel is fine. But, if the scene isn't working, then it isn't working. He can't add it because they'll feel bad or be pissed.

A nice e-mail with the scene after the movie is complete will surfice, and of course if they were promised a complete DVD they would have to receive a copy. They did their part, it just didn't make it to the final cut.