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spacecadetmotionpictures
06-25-2013, 02:20 AM
I just ordered an Audiotechnica AT897 shotgun microphone online to plug into my portable Tascam DR40 Linear PCM audio recorder for capturing dialog for a couple of shorts I'm working on this summer. I will be ordering another AT897 soon so that I have at least two, which can both be plugged into the DR40 discreetly. I will be shooting both indoors and out for these projects.

I have a bit of experience with audio equipment from a conference audio/video (PSAV) job I did a few years ago, but beyond that I don't know much about technique for capturing audio on set.

Does anyone have some good tips and tricks to get the most out of my limited equipment? Any good tutorials?

I should also mention that I have a USB large diaphram Blue Snowball microphone and will have access to a laptop for recording with it. Perhaps for ambient sounds. Foley...

Anonymous Filmmaker
06-25-2013, 04:01 AM
I am not an audio expert, but I do know of one simple tip. Before each shot that you film, clap your hands in front of the camera, and also where you hear the audio. This will make sinking the sound up in post a lot easier. Also, buy a windscreen if you don't have one already. I look forward to hearing more good audio tips! (Because I could probably use them :)

Vance Baryn
06-25-2013, 04:15 AM
It sounds like you have ordered some good equipment. I also use the DR40 and a similar quality shotgun mic. They should serve you well.

Here are a few tips:

1. Make sure the microphone is as close to the sound source as possible and pointed at it. Use a boom pole. (yes I know this seems obvious but it might not be for someone)

2. pay attention to what the audio sounds like when the mic is placed in different locations. It will sound different depending on mic placement. Usually dialogue is best recorded from above the actors' heads.

3. Have someone who's job it is to monitor the sound with noise canceling headphones and also keeping an eye on the level meter on the DR40. This person should be notifying you of all undesirable audio or other problems.

4. After the first take in each location, listen to the audio yourself to make sure it's what you want and there are no problems.

As to Anonymous Filmmaker's suggestion, I would suggest actually getting yourself a clapper board. Presumably you're going to be slating your shots anyway, so just get a dry erase clapper board. They're not expensive.

That's all I have for now.

Anonymous Filmmaker
06-25-2013, 04:26 AM
Oh, something else I thought of when reading Vance's tips: record a little bit of audio in each location, just to use as backup if necessary for re-recording, or anything else if necessary.

spacecadetmotionpictures
06-25-2013, 06:29 AM
I am not an audio expert, but I do know of one simple tip. Before each shot that you film, clap your hands in front of the camera, and also where you hear the audio. This will make sinking the sound up in post a lot easier. Also, buy a windscreen if you don't have one already. I look forward to hearing more good audio tips! (Because I could probably use them :)


It sounds like you have ordered some good equipment. I also use the DR40 and a similar quality shotgun mic. They should serve you well.

Here are a few tips:

1. Make sure the microphone is as close to the sound source as possible and pointed at it. Use a boom pole. (yes I know this seems obvious but it might not be for someone)

2. pay attention to what the audio sounds like when the mic is placed in different locations. It will sound different depending on mic placement. Usually dialogue is best recorded from above the actors' heads.

3. Have someone who's job it is to monitor the sound with noise canceling headphones and also keeping an eye on the level meter on the DR40. This person should be notifying you of all undesirable audio or other problems.

4. After the first take in each location, listen to the audio yourself to make sure it's what you want and there are no problems.

As to Anonymous Filmmaker's suggestion, I would suggest actually getting yourself a clapper board. Presumably you're going to be slating your shots anyway, so just get a dry erase clapper board. They're not expensive.

That's all I have for now.

Thanks Vance!

I have noticed that the DR40 produces some it's own noise when I am using the internal microphones and I'm not sure if it will still do this when I plug in with the AT897. However, I did use it to record some piano the other day and then played around in Adobe Audition to remove the noise and it did a fairly decent job.

I think I have a pretty good ear, so I will make sure to follow your advice and listen both before and after the shoot, but I am going to have to trust someone else to do the job while shooting. If I'm lucky, I'll find someone with some kind of audio experience and an ear for it, but in my position, I can't be picky and might have to train someone. (unfortunately and fortunately there is very very little for filmmaking outside of Vancouver and Ontario in Canada, and so there is little for 'out of the box' skill around here).

Do you have any advice for post editing to get a really nice warm voice sound?

AF, It's funny you mentioned clapping my hands. I was doing that for a bit when I was recording audio using my USB microphone, and my inexperienced help was giving me this strange look like "aren't you supposed to clap after the performance!?" So I explained it's purpose to them and they were really amazed. LOL But my first major equipment purchase was an acrylic clapperboard with the colored clapper sticks from myclapperboard.com... That was an exciting day for me; made me really feel like I was on my way to becoming a pro, so I made it my facebook profile picture. From the bit of test footage I've done with it, it is way better than clapping my hands; really easy to see when the sticks make contact on screen and it makes a nice sharp thin spike in the audio track that is super easy to sync.

I am wondering what you mean by recording a bit of audio in each location. Do you mean when I'm scouting out my locations? Or just extra for like ambient sounds and foley?

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 06:39 AM
All good advice.

If you have a little extra cash, buy 2 wireless mics, they were invaluable when we shot outdoors. While it's not perfect. Everything we shot with the wireless mics are useable where the over head mic is not for outdoor shots. They were easy to set up and use.

If you haven't bought a boom pole spend the extra $20 and get the lightest one you can get. The person holding it will thank you. It's tough work holding that pole.

Anonymous Filmmaker
06-25-2013, 06:50 AM
I meant for ambient sound. If you later discover you couldn't use the audio in one of the shots, it will sound more natural if you do the voice over on top of that.

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 07:14 AM
I meant for ambient sound. If you later discover you couldn't use the audio in one of the shots, it will sound more natural if you do the voice over on top of that.

I've also found that room tones change just a bit, so by having room tone, there might be a take that's usable,but the BG sound is off just a little, so you use the room tone under it.

Another thing I found useful when ADR wasn't possible is, adding room tone and outside noise under the dialogue. It's noisier, but, at least it's consistant.

Vance Baryn
06-25-2013, 07:50 AM
But my first major equipment purchase was an acrylic clapperboard with the colored clapper sticks from myclapperboard.com... That was an exciting day for me; made me really feel like I was on my way to becoming a pro, so I made it my facebook profile picture. From the bit of test footage I've done with it, it is way better than clapping my hands; really easy to see when the sticks make contact on screen and it makes a nice sharp thin spike in the audio track that is super easy to sync.


Yeah the shoot I did this weekend we forgot the clapper board when we went to the first location so we were clapping our hands. It works in a pinch, but yes the clapper board is much easier to see and makes a nice clean sound.

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 08:19 AM
Yeah the shoot I did this weekend we forgot the clapper board when we went to the first location so we were clapping our hands. It works in a pinch, but yes the clapper board is much easier to see and makes a nice clean sound.

Clapper boards were valuable when shooting film. Becasue there is no sound on film. With MiniDV or most digital recorders there is sound (good or bad). So, clapper boards are at best a novelty nowadays. I say action and clap.

I personally use the sound from the video to sync the real sound. Most of the time I'll watch the video with the bad sound, edit that way,and then add the good sound once I have the sequence edited. It sounds like it would add work, but it doesn't. If you have ten takes and are only going to use 2 or 3 you're not syncing 10 clips just the necessary ones. Because you can edit bad sound dialogue to good sound dialogue it's all around easier.

Vance Baryn
06-25-2013, 08:39 AM
clapper boards are at best a novelty nowadays.

I completely disagree with you.

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 09:31 AM
I completely disagree with you.

Okay. But, why?

What practical purpose do clappers have that mediocre organizational skills can't accomplish?

Clappers were necessary for syncing sound, noting takes, scenes, and sound takes.

Nowadays there's crap audio on most digital recorders that make syncing sound easier. If you open the crap sound in Final Cut (which I use), I can see my handclap without moving anything it's just there. I do the same to the real sound and I'm done. I don't have to watch and wait for the clapper board to come into frame and clap. Audio waves are much easier to notice and cut.

Since footage can almost immediately be downloaded to a HD, within minutes you can create folders for each scene and drop the appropriate takes within each folder.

I don't know how the computerized clapper boards work. I'm told they make syncing sound extremely easy. But, again I don't know. I just know they're expensive.

Clappers are cool and fun. But, after a while, just a burden.

The only thing a clapper could still be semi-useful for is if you note while on set the take you think will be the used take in editing. Even though I know the last take is usually the best take, I still look through everything to see if there's a nugget within another take.

spacecadetmotionpictures
06-25-2013, 03:22 PM
AF, good advice. Now that you've said it, it seems like such a duh thing to do, but I didn't even think to do it.

I have to agree with Vance about the clapperboard. I haven't had much experience using it in production yet, but from the test footage I've been doing, it is a godsend. It's so easy to scrub through the footage and spot each take, especially if I don't stop the camera to create a new file with each new take (which I didn't do because I was also in front of the camera for this).

I'm going to try and get some wireless Lavs at some point, but I'm pretty sure I won't have the budget to get them before I start shooting Walk with the Devil.

Unique, I am curious about one thing though. How do you do all of your cuts with the original attached audio and then cut the good audio into that? Right now in my tests, the first thing I do is sync the good audio and attach it to the video so that all the video/audio cuts stay together. It seems that cutting the good audio to match the video cuts afterwards would be a lot of work.

I was also reading up on ADR, and quite frankly it kinda scares me a bit. I definitely hope that my audio captured on set is good enough to avoid having to ADR.

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 04:54 PM
AF, good advice. Now that you've said it, it seems like such a duh thing to do, but I didn't even think to do it.

I have to agree with Vance about the clapperboard. I haven't had much experience using it in production yet, but from the test footage I've been doing, it is a godsend. It's so easy to scrub through the footage and spot each take, especially if I don't stop the camera to create a new file with each new take (which I didn't do because I was also in front of the camera for this).

I'm going to try and get some wireless Lavs at some point, but I'm pretty sure I won't have the budget to get them before I start shooting Walk with the Devil.

Unique, I am curious about one thing though. How do you do all of your cuts with the original attached audio and then cut the good audio into that? Right now in my tests, the first thing I do is sync the good audio and attach it to the video so that all the video/audio cuts stay together. It seems that cutting the good audio to match the video cuts afterwards would be a lot of work.

I was also reading up on ADR, and quite frankly it kinda scares me a bit. I definitely hope that my audio captured on set is good enough to avoid having to ADR.

Let me just tell you about ADR, it's easy (if the person knows what they're doing) to record. But, a lot of actors suck at it. I've only had one person come in to do ADR that was a great actor and was able to do ADR with no problems. Everyone else was like pulling teeth. I'm a method actor and I'm not methoding,,, Yep.

The reason adding real audio is easier for me after I've edited the scene is because of the amount of takes I have for each scene. I can have 30 takes per scene (wide - med - close ups - special shots) so to put all the audio onto each take is time consuming. Many times you won't use the audio from that take anyway. But, if I use 8 takes, and edit the audio in after it's cut, it takes no time to cut and paste. Plus, it's just extremely easy in Final Cut to move a frame forward and hit a distinct audio wave that stands out like a sore thumb. Maybe it's just me, by looking at certain waves I know exactly what's being said.

You've made a use for your clapper board which is useful but not necessary. You could also stand in front of the camera and jump up and down for a moment to diferentiate between takes. There's a lot of ways to get around a clapper. I'm not saying it's not handy. But it's not indispensible anymore. It's something people use because it's a classic "moviemaking" tool. It's the one thing that if it magically disappeared from the set, you could go on shooting without losing a beat. In your case, you'd be more careful with stopping between takes. Of course when you slate without a clapper you have to mention the sound file being recorded... "Okay, Sound 42 and action" followed by a nice handclap.

I edit on the word Action. The A in action stands out better than the handclap.

Of course a lot has to do with how you're going to handle post production. I never bothered slating or saying the scene number or take. Every night after shooting every take was split up and went into their respective folders. I had 100 scenes for my last project, so I had 100 folders. I used the shooting script for the scene numbers.

Everyone works differently. So, my ways might make many peoples head spin. Find your easy way and have fun doing it.

Anonymous Filmmaker
06-25-2013, 05:15 PM
If you do a lot of audio syncing, I would look in to a product called Plural Eyes. It was bought recently by Red Giant and you can see it here (http://www.redgiant.com/products/all/pluraleyes/). I've heard that it automatically syncs up sound pretty well, but I haven't tried it myself. I saw the film that they advertise in the promotional video, and the audio looked perfect!

UniqueAmI
06-25-2013, 08:25 PM
If you do a lot of audio syncing, I would look in to a product called Plural Eyes. It was bought recently by Red Giant and you can see it here (http://www.redgiant.com/products/all/pluraleyes/). I've heard that it automatically syncs up sound pretty well, but I haven't tried it myself. I saw the film that they advertise in the promotional video, and the audio looked perfect!

That program did look neat.

There's a really cool music software called MELODYNE. You can literally go in and fix notes. You sang an A and meant A# it's a few clicks away. You can shorten or enlong your notes. It's an incredible program. Unfortunately, not user friendly. But, the company is quick to respond to problems. Unfortunately, they're German, and their english e-mails need translation.

Vance Baryn
06-25-2013, 09:49 PM
What practical purpose do clappers have that mediocre organizational skills can't accomplish?

I presume that you slate your shots? If not, you'd just be working with a whole mess of confusing footage that would take forever to sort out. Since you're slating the shots anyway, why not use a clapper so you can get a very distinct sound spike that exists on the camera audio as well as external audio that you can sync up in seconds?

I agree with you that clapper boards are not indispensable any more. However, what I disagreed with was that you said they are "at best a novelty." This is absolutely not true. Far from being a novelty, they are a useful tool that makes things go much faster and easier in the editing phase.

As I said before, I have just recently shot a short film in which one location did not have a clapper and the other did. It is fresh in my mind how much easier having a clapper makes things.

Anonymous Filmmaker
06-26-2013, 03:42 AM
There's a really cool music software called MELODYNE. You can literally go in and fix notes. You sang an A and meant A# it's a few clicks away. You can shorten or enlong your notes. It's an incredible program. Unfortunately, not user friendly. But, the company is quick to respond to problems. Unfortunately, they're German, and their english e-mails need translation.

Wow, just looked it up, and it seems really cool!

UniqueAmI
06-26-2013, 07:01 AM
I presume that you slate your shots? If not, you'd just be working with a whole mess of confusing footage that would take forever to sort out. Since you're slating the shots anyway, why not use a clapper so you can get a very distinct sound spike that exists on the camera audio as well as external audio that you can sync up in seconds?

I agree with you that clapper boards are not indispensable any more. However, what I disagreed with was that you said they are "at best a novelty." This is absolutely not true. Far from being a novelty, they are a useful tool that makes things go much faster and easier in the editing phase.

As I said before, I have just recently shot a short film in which one location did not have a clapper and the other did. It is fresh in my mind how much easier having a clapper makes things.

All I do is say "Rolling... Sound 1... and Action" then I clap. That's it. For me that's all that's needed.

That's where the mediocre organizational skills come in.

If you're on set and know what scenes you've shot there is no cofusion. For example - Today we're shooting Scenes 10, 14, 4, 90

Under normal circumstances you'll shoot the Wide shot of Scene 10 then go onto your Medium shots, CUs, special shots... Then you'll move onto scene 14. After each take we stop the camera and restart on the next take and sound. There are times when I'll just say "From the top Action". With that you can see from the take length that there's more than one take there.

That night I'll take the footage and break it down into folders by scene. I don't even have to look at the footage just the thumbnail. When you see the last CU and the next is a Wide shot you know you've moved onto the next scene. It's very easy.

When I gave up the project and had someone else shoot the rest (man did they suck),they gave me everything at once. They shot shit I had no idea what it was. It wasn't from my script. Yet, I was able to within a half hour take almost a 2 TB HD filled with footage and separate it into folders. Because they shot a full scene and moved onto the next.

The way I'd know what sound files to put into each folder was by listening to the beginning of the first shot and last shot per scene. It always works out that if there's 10 shots, there's 10 sound files. It works like a charm.

As I stated before this is the way I work. Most everything I've edited hasn't had clappers, and there wasn't a moment when I got frustrated or thought why didn't they use a clapper. For my first movie I used the clapper the first few days and tossed it aside, it was a nuisance.

spacecadetmotionpictures
06-27-2013, 05:13 PM
Today my AT897 shotgun mic was delivered by courier. :-D

However, it's kinda bittersweet because I ordered the XLR cable from a different seller and it's still in the mail. Unfortunately, this is my first XLR cable, so I can't even plug in the mic and test it yet. :-(

HDocks
08-07-2013, 04:44 PM
Just wondered when people are recording audio do you tend to link your mics up to field recording devices such as the ZoomH4N?

My camcorder has no XLR inputs so I have been using a Beach Tech adapter and attaching a Rode NTG2 to that with the Beach Tech going straight to the camcorder. I have been having problems with this since a, it does not get the mic close enough to subject and b, I have been getting loads of unpleasant interference noises and it does not appear to be recording clean audio this way. I'm not sure why ?? I have tried to adjust gain levels on the camcorder and turn off the agc etc nothing is working

Can someone help? What would you recommend?

Director
08-07-2013, 07:26 PM
Here's my one and only tip. Never burn your audio too hot. I made that mistake once...ONCE. Because if you ever do, like I'm sure we all have (well, everyone except the liars), then you will know pain. As you can't clean the distortion from an audio track that was burned too hot.

So, use your head phones and watch your gauges.

Love & Kisses
Director :)~

HDocks
08-08-2013, 01:33 AM
Ok thanks, what does this mean burning audio too hot?

spacecadetmotionpictures
08-08-2013, 02:11 AM
Just wondered when people are recording audio do you tend to link your mics up to field recording devices such as the ZoomH4N?

My camcorder has no XLR inputs so I have been using a Beach Tech adapter and attaching a Rode NTG2 to that with the Beach Tech going straight to the camcorder. I have been having problems with this since a, it does not get the mic close enough to subject and b, I have been getting loads of unpleasant interference noises and it does not appear to be recording clean audio this way. I'm not sure why ?? I have tried to adjust gain levels on the camcorder and turn off the agc etc nothing is working

Can someone help? What would you recommend?

Without knowing which adapter you are using, it's a bit hard to pinpoint your problem. You could be plugging a balanced signal (XLR) into a stereo jack, which causes all kinds of issues... Or, it could be as Director pointed out and you're running too hot.

Can you share your camcorder brand & model and the model of the adapter you are using?

HDocks
08-08-2013, 07:47 AM
Yeah sure I am using a Panasonic HDC HS900 and attaching a Dual Phantom power adapter Beach Tech DXA-6 as well as the Rode NTG2, any help would be great
do you think it would be better to just record the sound separately? just annoying as I bought the adapter already

Director
08-08-2013, 07:54 AM
Ok thanks, what does this mean burning audio too hot?

Too much gain.

Aaron Jones
08-09-2013, 01:21 PM
I guess i did just the opposite, which figures... I went downtown to shoot the Gospel Fest. It was a outdoor event and I had a friend performing. I had my main camera set at the stage and i was buzzing around with my cut away cam trying to get good angles to edit. All the while the main camera mic was not even turned on. and the only sound I got was from the cut away cam in bits and pieces. I had just got a shotgun mic and I was playing around with it a couple of days before this event and left the setting on external mic and I did not have the external mic. That was crushing when they see you filming and thinking they are about to have a filmed performance and.... NOTHTING!

So since I bought a Zoom H4n and I'm looking to utilize it as well as the cam's mic or shotgun. I think I was filming for about 2 1/2 hours. That blows.

HDocks
08-09-2013, 01:28 PM
Ah that sucks :/ Let me know if the H4n is any good I'm looking to invest in one myself

Aaron Jones
08-10-2013, 10:51 PM
Thanks Vance!

I have noticed that the DR40 produces some it's own noise when I am using the internal microphones and I'm not sure if it will still do this when I plug in with the AT897.


I have read this on reviews. For the most part they say that it is mostly only when using the built in mics... Not sure if that helps or not. My source for this was B & H website under Tascam DR40 reviews. I'm looking forward to some interesting projects bro.

One tip that I found to be very helpful was to record 2 tracks simultaneously. Utilizing both inputs by way of splitter. Adjusting one track to the normal range and the second track down a bit lower. For the sole purpose of accident over gain. if the gain peaks on you on accident then you have another lower one that will be perfect and it is just a matter of editing the safe volume track in. I have not tried it yet but this seemed very helpful while I was gathering information about the Digital device I purchased.

Aaron Jones
08-10-2013, 11:16 PM
Yeah sure I am using a Panasonic HDC HS900 and attaching a Dual Phantom power adapter Beach Tech DXA-6 as well as the Rode NTG2, any help would be great
do you think it would be better to just record the sound separately? just annoying as I bought the adapter already

I found this on a review at Amazon for your Beach Tech DXA-6, "Had problems with noise until I found out from there helpful support that you need to keep the input on the camera down to 25% and turn up the Beachteck.". I hope it helps.

HDocks
08-14-2013, 06:41 AM
Thanks for the advice Aaron, now this is really weird because I tried that and every time i've been using the beach Tech i've been using manual controls on the camera put the input down to 25 % and turning the AGC off each time still loads of noise
I try everything again but this time turn the agc on which is the opposite of what everyone has been saying to do and for some reason the audio now comes out pretty clean! wtff

Aaron Jones
08-17-2013, 09:31 AM
I guess long as it works consistently that is a good thing.

khathawayart
10-04-2013, 12:32 PM
I didn't read all the replies here, so I may be retreading, but this is what I know from using old film-style tape nagras and the newer Zoom recorders:

Get your mics as close as possible to the actors when shooting. Hide 'em behind props if needed, or have a boom overhead.

Adjust the record signal as loud as possible without the signal spiking. DO NOT adjust it down if you get wind noise or other BG noise--then you're just lowering the voices, too {I had to edit a film where this was done--it was a nightmare}.

Use a slate at the head of each take--so you can sync the audio with the video later. In addition, shout out a sync word [anything: "hamster," "toothbrush," "bathrobe"]. With a different word for each take, it'll be easier to match up the audio to the correct video clip [or use "scene 6A, take 5" instead]. Without some kind of audio ID, matching the audio to the video may be a nightmare [the same movie I edited referenced above].


Kurt Hathaway
-------------------
VikingDream7 Productions
Video Production & Editing

khathawayart[at]gmail.com

Director
10-04-2013, 04:38 PM
shout out a sync word [anything: "hamster," "toothbrush," "bathrobe"

I like "bathrobe", it's easier to see the mouth make a "B" sound, as opposed to "Hamster". :)~

khathawayart
10-04-2013, 05:13 PM
To be clear, the sync word is not meant as a sync point--that's what the slate is for {I know you know this, Director, I'm just qualifying for others}. The sync word is meant to match up the video file with its corresponding remote or external audio file in post.

The syc word will help to match up the video and its audio files, so that you may THEN proceed with syncing.

I came to this idea while editing a small feature in which no slate numbers were used. I guess the thinking was that video file number 7 would match up to audio file number 7 on any given shooting day. The idea was to have the same number of video files as audio files. Then move down the list one by one in post to sync them.

What happened was lots of stops and starts on both the video and audio. Sometimes the audio guy wasn't turning on his machine.

At the end of any given day there were more {or fewer} audio files than video files. With no slate numbers, matching them up meant listening to each one until thru trial and error so I could match the audio to the proper video. In some cases, I never did find audio that matched some video takes. It was a pain and took waaa-aay longer than it should have.

With sync words --or slate numbers--the confusion and resulting wasted time wouldn't have occurred. Sync up the "Hamster" video with the "Hamster" audio and move on to the next, etc. This of course, wouldn't work in the film days when film didn't record audio, too. But with video it allows matching the correct audio to the correct video faster. Then from there, use the slate to sync it. The sync word is an identifier only.

But those who use slate numbers don't need sync words...as long as the slate numbers are said aloud for the audio to pick up. But I suspect a lot of lower-budget productions don't have a dedicated slate person to swap out the numbers in between takes, so sync words are an alternate solution rather than keeping track of slate numbers.


Kurt Hathaway
-------------------
VikingDream7 Productions
Video Production & Editing

khathawayart[at]gmail.com

spacecadetmotionpictures
10-04-2013, 09:07 PM
I didn't read all the replies here, so I may be retreading, but this is what I know from using old film-style tape nagras and the newer Zoom recorders:

Get your mics as close as possible to the actors when shooting. Hide 'em behind props if needed, or have a boom overhead.

Adjust the record signal as loud as possible without the signal spiking. DO NOT adjust it down if you get wind noise or other BG noise--then you're just lowering the voices, too {I had to edit a film where this was done--it was a nightmare}.

Use a slate at the head of each take--so you can sync the audio with the video later. In addition, shout out a sync word [anything: "hamster," "toothbrush," "bathrobe"]. With a different word for each take, it'll be easier to match up the audio to the correct video clip [or use "scene 6A, take 5" instead]. Without some kind of audio ID, matching the audio to the video may be a nightmare [the same movie I edited referenced above].


Kurt Hathaway
-------------------
VikingDream7 Productions
Video Production & Editing

khathawayart[at]gmail.com

Thanks for the tips Kurt. I really like the idea of Sync words as well.

I posted a thread the other day with a video of my producer and I practicing using the boom pole and microphone... I would really appreciate some feedback on how we did with it:

http://www.filmmakerforum.org/off-topic-chat/2931-boom-pole-shotgun-mic-training-practice-video.html

Mick Scarborough
10-05-2013, 05:20 PM
I guess I am old school. Even if there was something that rendered clapperboards obsolete, I would still use them for the sake of tradition.