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Troy
03-12-2013, 08:30 PM
I need some opinions and ideas on how to get around the problem of creating a film with extremely small amount of resources. I don't have a crew, many places to shoot or a huge amount of money to spend.

I have been trying to find people interested though friends or craigslist but it seems no one in my area is that interested in it. Though i have worked with after effect and though it takes longer to make. I can create duplicates of myself to interact with and even make the camera move with out a camera man.

I have been doing a bit of research into laws of shooting films in public areas but a while ago i did learn people don't take it kindly here. I do have access to nature, apartments and possibly parts of the city where no one will see me.

So my main 3 questions:
1) How do you make a script (That you plan to film yourself) when knowing how little you can or can't actually do?

2) Should i just keep working with video effects until better opportunities present themselves?

3) What are some basic laws when it comes to shooting film in a public area?

I appreciate any sort of input. :D

tseverio
03-13-2013, 06:48 AM
1. Write the script based on the budget you have or will have. So that means keeping stunts, locations, talent etc. to a very minimum. For example, write your script to take place in 1 to 2 locations max. 4 to 5 actors...even less. No stunts...no creatures and crazy makeup. If effects are required, be able to do them yourself or don't write them in. Always plan to feed your talent and crew...PIZZA is cheap!

2. Don't wait for anything. You create opportunities by doing. Make it and they will come. :)

3. Simple permits if you have a crew. If you hand hold a DSLR (without a tripod) in a public place like a street in New Orleans, you can get away for nothing. When you put a camera on a tripod, have crew and talent...then you need to look at permits. Again, write your script to stay away from places that require permits. Try private locations and get permission. They will usually allow you to do it for nothing when it's a small production. Hope that helps!

Tony

payperfilm
03-13-2013, 01:37 PM
The number of actors is less important than the number of actor days or number of days an actor is needed on the set.
For example: 5 actors [at] 10 days (your typical kids in woods that get killed) = 50 actor days.
Versus: 1 actor [at] 10 days + 9 actors [at] 1 Day a piece = 19 actor days

Many times you can shoot all of the scenes that a particular actor is in on one day. Plus you are more likely to find one
actor who can commit to 10 days than to find five especially if you aren't paying.

Phil

Nick Soares
03-13-2013, 04:32 PM
1) How do you make a script (That you plan to film yourself) when knowing how little you can or can't actually do?

Well if you want to write a script then you will, no matter if you are stressed about it getting made or not. Also you never know what kind of talent you might be hiding if you don't try. Maybe start out with a 5 page script, and try and shoot it.

2) Should i just keep working with video effects until better opportunities present themselves?

If you have the time, then its always good to learn new skills related to filmmaking, but you should should really try and film something soon to see what you really want to do and then start to focus on that.

3) What are some basic laws when it comes to shooting film in a public area?

See if there is a local Film Commissioner in your city, you can acquire permits through him/her - If there is no one then you can just try to get permission from the city - Chances are though that your productions will be so small at first that you won't need a permit, just go film. If you are dealing with peoples faces and you feel that you might your film will be public then you will need consent forms, but if will just be for personal use then you do not...

I feel that this should be in the public forums, do you mind if I move it there or no?

Troy
03-14-2013, 11:06 AM
1) How do you make a script (That you plan to film yourself) when knowing how little you can or can't actually do?

Well if you want to write a script then you will, no matter if you are stressed about it getting made or not. Also you never know what kind of talent you might be hiding if you don't try. Maybe start out with a 5 page script, and try and shoot it.

2) Should i just keep working with video effects until better opportunities present themselves?

If you have the time, then its always good to learn new skills related to filmmaking, but you should should really try and film something soon to see what you really want to do and then start to focus on that.

3) What are some basic laws when it comes to shooting film in a public area?

See if there is a local Film Commissioner in your city, you can acquire permits through him/her - If there is no one then you can just try to get permission from the city - Chances are though that your productions will be so small at first that you won't need a permit, just go film. If you are dealing with peoples faces and you feel that you might your film will be public then you will need consent forms, but if will just be for personal use then you do not...

I feel that this should be in the public forums, do you mind if I move it there or no?

Wanted to run it past the pro-members first. You can move it now if you want. :)

Director
03-14-2013, 08:10 PM
Troy

Since you didn't mention what you're interested in shooting, it's a little more difficult to give any better answers than what you've already received here. Also, you didn't mention where you live, so I'm assuming it must be a real small town. If there are 10,000 people or more, than you shouldn't have too much problems finding amateur actors.

Alternatively, you could consider shooting a documentary where you use a lot of stock footage.

Your first production is always the bitch of the bunch, but as Tony so wisely put it, don't wait on anything.

Nick Soares
03-14-2013, 08:22 PM
Wanted to run it past the pro-members first. You can move it now if you want. :)

You are absolutely right, and great that you did exactly what I wanted people to do with the PRO Section. Also, in the PRO section you have to ability to tell me "no" :) - unlike public sections :) -- FYI book is on its way!

Mark
03-15-2013, 10:59 AM
Thanks for the info guys, appreciate everyones views on this. Great question Troy!

Troy
03-16-2013, 03:17 PM
Troy

Since you didn't mention what you're interested in shooting, it's a little more difficult to give any better answers than what you've already received here. Also, you didn't mention where you live, so I'm assuming it must be a real small town. If there are 10,000 people or more, than you shouldn't have too much problems finding amateur actors.

Alternatively, you could consider shooting a documentary where you use a lot of stock footage.

Your first production is always the bitch of the bunch, but as Tony so wisely put it, don't wait on anything.

Its about a population of 170,000 people. The problem is that all the actors and film go to Vancouver instead of here. I'm ok with any sort of films really but if i was to choose one i really like sci fi.

Where exactly do you find stock footage?

Director
03-17-2013, 08:18 PM
Its about a population of 170,000 people. The problem is that all the actors and film go to Vancouver instead of here. I'm ok with any sort of films really but if i was to choose one i really like sci fi.

Where exactly do you find stock footage?

With 170,000 pop. you should have all kinds of resources available, just dig deeper.

Regarding stock footage, just Google it, there are a ton of sites that sell it, i.e. videoblocks.com, stockfootage.com, shutterstock.com, and the list is endless.

Now, if you want to do a Sci-Fi (Blade Runner is one of my favorite movies), you're going to have a tough row to hoe. Meaning, if it looks fake or cheesy, why even bother. Sci-Fi film requires either a hell of a lot of props, or a hell of a lot of CGi, but either way, you're talking about an enormous amount of work.

If this is your first film, may I suggest starting out with something less prop and background heavy, which usually ends up being dialogue heavy drama, or, you could do a horror film where you suggest the monster more than you show it. It worked great in Jaws, and look how much that dumb ass film Blair Witch Project earned. Somebody please, hook me up with the marketing genius connected to that film.

Bryce Welsh
03-28-2013, 10:20 PM
Well I am 13 and for my film, what I did was I got some of my friends to sign contracts, and I am having them all do individual jobs. There is my crew...low budget, but at least it is not all on you. Bribe them with money, too. promise them a small percentage of the income. That will keep them on track.

Every time I come into some money, I get something. over the course of almost a year, I slowly got myself Final Cut Pro X, a panasonic SDR-T50, a GoPro Hero 3 Silver, a tripod dolly, a tripod, and a boom mic! So what if I am 50 dollars in dept...

Director
03-29-2013, 07:32 PM
Well I am 13 and for my film, what I did was I got some of my friends to sign contracts...

LOL, 13 years old and he has his friends under contract! I love it. He'll probably wind up a billionaire. Kudos to you Bryce. :)~

gorillafilms
03-29-2013, 08:05 PM
i sent you a pm with the THE ROBERT RODRIGUEZ TEN-MINUTE FILM COURSE

he is a bit extreme but it can work

be your own crew : never feed anyone etc ...

gorillafilms
03-29-2013, 08:39 PM
here a very good video of advices and tips from Dov Simens

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtlKaNmnaao