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Patrick Wiley
02-10-2013, 03:19 PM
I apply for tons of crew gigs but I don't get many callbacks.

I have quite a bit of crew experience. I PAed for the X-factor twice when it came to Rhode Island and I've been working as a part time Associate Producer for a small production company. I figure that should be enough to qualify me for most PA or grip gigs but I can't seem to land any.

Maybe its just a matter of too much competition but I wonder if there's something I'm putting on my resume or in my cover letters that makes UPMs don't like to see.

So for those of you with a lot of experience hiring crew, what do you look for in crew applications, and what makes you delete a resume on sight?

Nick Soares
02-10-2013, 03:24 PM
Oh my friend, OH! All of this will be settled when my new creation is released! Hang tight, only a few more weeks :)

Ok, to answer your question:

An associate producer is looked at as a "assistant to prodcuer" or a "Gopher" to producer. So it isn't the really a Stand Out credit, unless you are talking studio films.

But I don't think that is the issue, its the current system. Craigslist does work, but its tough to pick and choose, not to mention the hundreds of emails that come in. When I was doing my first show I took me three full days to go through all the emails.

When you are submitting, make it personal. Dont just have a resume attached.

Other then that, yea its competition.

Patrick Wiley
02-10-2013, 04:39 PM
Truth be told I just sort of requested the title. Basically our producer delegates to me whatever needs to get done. It might be editing a promo video, putting up adds for interns, calling distributors ect. If I ask the producer to upgrade my title he will so is there something better I should ask to be called?

BLAREMedia
02-10-2013, 10:52 PM
It often helps to just keep calling. I know it sounds weird but I will always give a guy a chance at least once if he bothers me enough. When you are a PA the most important thing is to be quiet and do your job. It is hugely important not to talk about "your project" and how many productions you've been a part of and how you would do things if you were the director. I'll fire or call out people on the spot if they start talking about how they would do an above the line job better if they were doing it. Work hard, work smart, work efficiently and don't complain. Always have a smile on your face and a can-do attitude and you'll already be better than most people. All it takes is 1 opening. People will spread your name around if you are really good and it will quickly lead to more work. If it doesn't, just keep being a great worker. That's the most important thing.

Nick Soares
02-10-2013, 11:24 PM
Justin, aka BLAREMedia owns the best production company in the central valley, definitely take his advice!

Paul77
02-10-2013, 11:34 PM
great infomation guys, thank you! I too will keep this in mined

Patrick Wiley
02-11-2013, 08:06 PM
It often helps to just keep calling. I know it sounds weird but I will always give a guy a chance at least once if he bothers me enough.

Thanks, that's definitely something I wasn't doing.

khathawayart
02-14-2013, 03:09 PM
Blaremedia is correct about the on-set attitude.

Anyone on a film crew should be ready to do anything that needs being done [on a non-union show, of course].

My attitude was always one of: Lemme know what you need to the director....sound department, camera, whatever. Move cables, move lights, man the mic boom, etc.

I once had a camera assistant [a girl] who refused to carry any equipment. She wasn't used to "working" or taking orders and thought moving stuff was beneath her. I fired her on the spot even though we were on location far from home.

Luckily I've never seen that kind of attitude again.

Kurt Hathaway
-------------------
VikingDream7 Productions
Video Production & Editing

khathawayart[at]gmail.com

Patrick Wiley
02-17-2013, 07:55 PM
Oh my friend, OH! All of this will be settled when my new creation is released! Hang tight, only a few more weeks :)



Are you doing something on the East Coast?

leetvfilms
02-17-2013, 08:04 PM
Yeah I hear ya. I frequent mandy.com and productionhub and apply for various post production jobs and don't hear anything back. Last year, I got two jobs from productionhub last year. But since then, nothing. Gonna be hitting up Motor City Nightmares in April down in Detroit so me and my partner are hoping to get into contact with some cool people :)