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Nick Soares
01-09-2013, 09:26 PM
Have a short film, but feel distribution is not an option, think again.

http://www.filmmakerforum.org/images/digi3.jpg
http://www.filmmakerforum.org/image/digi3.jpg
Short Film Distribution (http://www.digidistribution.com)

DiGi Distribution is pleased to announce the ability to distributed short films.

Short Film History

A bit of history on short films via WikiPedia

Longer and shorter films coexisted with similar popularity throughout the early days of film. However, comedy short films were produced in large numbers compared to lengthy features such as D.W. Griffith's, "Birth of Nation" . By the 1920s, a ticket purchased a varied program including a feature and several supporting works from categories such as second feature, short comedy, 510 minute cartoon, and newsreel.
Short comedies were especially popular, and typically came in a serial (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_%28film%29) or series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_series) (such as the Our Gang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Gang) movies, or the many outings of Charlie Chaplin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Chaplin)'s Little Tramp character). Even though there was often no set release schedule, these series could be considered somewhat like a modern TV sitcom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sitcom) lower in status than feature films but nevertheless very popular (comedians such as Laurel and Hardy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laurel_and_Hardy), Charlie Chaplin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_Chaplin) and Buster Keaton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buster_Keaton) all 'graduated' from shorts to features).
Animated cartoons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animated_cartoon) came principally as short subjects, as did newsreels (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newsreel). Virtually all major film production companies had units assigned to develop and produce shorts, and many companies, especially in the silent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_movie) and very early sound era, produced mostly or only short subjects.
In the 1930s, the distribution system changed in many countries owing to the Great Depression (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Depression). Instead of the cinema owner assembling a program of their own choice, the studios sold a package centered on a main and supporting feature, a cartoon and little else. With the rise of the double feature (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_feature) as a cinema programming format, 2-reel shorts went into decline as a commercial category. Hal Roach (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Roach), for example, moved Laurel and Hardy full-time into feature films after 1935, and halved his popular Our Gang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Gang) films to one reel. By the 1940s, he'd moved out of short films altogether (though MGM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MGM) continued the Our Gang shorts until 1944).
Later shorts include George O'Hanlon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_O%27Hanlon)'s Joe McDoakes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_McDoakes) movies, and the animated work of studios such as Walt Disney Productions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Productions), Leon Schlesinger Productions/Warner Bros. Cartoons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warner_Bros._Cartoons), Walter Lantz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Lantz) and Fleischer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleischer_Studio) / Famous Studios (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famous_Studios). By the mid 1950s, with the rise of television (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television), the commercial live-action short was virtually dead, The Three Stooges (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Stooges) being the last major series of 2-reelers, ending in 1959. Short films had become a medium for student, independent and specialty work.
Cartoon shorts had a longer life, due in part to the implementation of lower-cost limited animation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limited_animation) techniques, but also declined in this period. Warner Bros. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warner_Bros.), one of the most prolific of the golden era, shut down its studio permanently in 1969. Woody Woodpecker (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woody_Woodpecker) was the last of the "golden era" cartoons to end, shutting down in 1972. The Pink Panther (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pink_Panther_%28character%29) was the last regular theatrical cartoon short series, having begun in 1964 (and thus having spent its entire existence in the limited animation era) and ended in 1980. By the 1960s, the market for animated shorts had largely shifted to television, and even the existing theatrical shorts were being secondarily syndicated to television stations.
The News

DiGi Distribution is currently accepting short films with a time length of 10 to 45 minutes. Although the indie film industry has been shaken by the economy, there is some light at the end of the tunnel. In the past feature films were the only way to get distributed for literally any platform. Now in addiction to feature films getting released Short Films can be added to the list of getting onto platforms like Hulu, Netflix (Late 2013) Cable VOD, and more, iTunes is still on hold but is in the works. Finally short films can make money other then getting uploaded to youtube and having adsense. DiGi Distribution has been negotiating with large platform and pleading to allow short films to be seen, the pleading has paid off so to say. There are some platform out there that allow short films to be uploaded and rented, but for most you might as well create you own site and sell it yourself, it's not the website's traffic that creates the sales it is the traffic you send to the link for purchase, again this has all changed. Getting your shorts to these platforms can create extra cashflow for the short film owners that was not previously available. If you have a short film enter code "filmmakerfourm" to avoid the $35 charge and reduce it to $1

Many people have noticed short films on Netflix, but when it came to doing research on how to get your own short film onto Netflix it seemed near impossible. This is because not very many companies have the ability to provide the service to aggregate short films onto the platform, the same goes with Hulu. How did DiGi Distribution do it? Well that lets just call it a secret recipe of constant negotiations and knowing the right people. DiGi Distribution has been working on this a long time, many times getting turned down, thankfully many of the companies have realized that short films can also make them a profit not just feature films. Short films can be of any genre including animation. Now that short films are gaining more recognition in the marketplace this opens up much economic opportunities for writers as well, short scripts will become more valuable and short films can now produce cashflow for the investors. If you have a short film and want to submit your film to be considered for Short Film Distribution keep in mined the code for a submission discount, and if you know other that have short films please pass on the code.

To submit a short film go to Submission | DIGI Distribution (http://www.digidistribution.com/submission/)

Nick Soares
<a href="https://profiles.google.com/108301998796885383716?rel=author">Google</a>

For those readers that don't know, I am the owner of DiGi Distribution, and I felt my forum would be a great place to start the news off.

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Jfvideos
01-14-2013, 02:48 PM
This sounds great. Do you have a link to a short film that demonstrates the minimal level of production quality you guys accept for distribution because I use low budget equip. You have seen my music videos

Nick Soares
01-14-2013, 04:31 PM
I will get you an example shortly

Nick Soares
01-16-2013, 06:36 PM
Jfvideos,

Here is a short film that was recently accepted:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTYv7xklmBA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTYv7xklmBA)

Havey
02-03-2013, 02:33 PM
Nick. I might be talking to you soon about this.