PDA

View Full Version : What Does Netflix Pay?



Nick Soares
12-30-2012, 08:16 PM
What does Netflix Pay for feature films accepted onto the platform?





I noticed today that there was not much information on the web about this so I figured I would write about my experiences with the films I produced and were accepted onto Netflix. I do believe somewhere in the contract there was a confidentiality part but it expires after about 7 years, which it has been, and those of you that want to get on platforms like Netflix and are excited to share your earnings be warned that it is FROWNED upon big time and could lead to getting blacklisted from Netflix and other companies, I will go over Black List in another article - they do exist.

The Films

My first film I got onto Netflix was Ghost Game (https://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/Ghost_Game/70050104?locale=en-US)
My second film i got onto Netflix was CULT (http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/Cult/70062819?locale=en-US)

Ill just talk about these two as one has no "Stars" - Ghost Game and the had some B Stars - CULT

The Money $$ - These are just some of my experiences

Ghost Game was licensed when Netflix stock was about $189 a share and the first year licensing fee was $3,500 for a full 365 days on Netflix DVD or Streaming. The following years it dropped about $1,000 a year up to the point where they offer $300

CULT was licensed when Netflix stock was about $230 a share and the first year was $8,000 - After such bad reviews the license fee dropped so bad, we had to ask for it to stay on a few years after.

Nowadays to get your film on Netflix (even through a distributor) you need lots of fans - You have to get your film in the Queue and if enough people add it then they will "think" about adding it to Netflix. The good'ol days of low-budget films getting money from Netflix is over IMO, and when I say low-budget I mean films like "Ghost Game" There are many great low-budget indies out there that will earn their spot on Netflix.


The Reason

The reason to be on Netflix 10 years ago and now (2012-2013) are very different. Back then it was additional cashflow, Now it is gaining popularity and fan base. Getting a film on Netflix with a website at the end of the credits or even people Google searching after finishing the film can greatly increase your Facebook followers, Twitter followers, etc...

The End

Netflix has shifted their focus and cash to acquiring Studio films or old school blockbusters, and unless you have a great Rep that can wiggle your film in, then currently I think your out of luck. Their is still hope though, its just your film needs to be very niche specific along with amazing quality and story, or a large theatrical release.


Nick Soares
Google (https://profiles.google.com/108301998796885383716?rel=author)



If you like this article share it - use the "Share" option to the right --->

Related Articles

How to sell a script
(http://www.filmmakerforum.org/articles/164-how-sell-script.html)
Get film investors (http://www.filmmakerforum.org/articles/1073-get-film-investors.html)

Getting into filmmaking (http://www.filmmakerforum.org/articles/1074-getting-into-filmmaking.html)

Making money with youtube Part 1 (http://www.filmmakerforum.org/articles/1079-making-money-youtube-part-1-a.html)

Making money with youtube Part 2 (http://www.filmmakerforum.org/articles/1082-making-money-youtube-part-2-a.html)

payperfilm
12-31-2012, 06:52 AM
Thanks for this valuable information, Nick. I have my movie Geek Mythology on Netflix as a DVD because I was more interested in having an audience than trying to grind out revenue from other places.

For my next film, Netflix will be the last place I go for revenue. I like them as a consumer but not as a filmmaker. But I have to admit that their streaming library feels limited at times.