Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better?
Thanks Thanks:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
+ Add Reply
Results 1 to 27 of 27

Topic: Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better?

    I watched some comparison videos, and it seems to me the Osmo is better. I asked a person who used the glidecam and he said it's crap and don't ever use it, and a professional production. But he didn't really say why. Does anyone know if this is pretty much true for a professional production?

    As for the Osmo it glides smoother in the videos for sure, however, I have questions about the Osmo camera itself. Can the shutter speed, ISO, aperture, and white balance all be manually set, or is it all automatic features?

    Also I am going to want to color match the footage, with footage from another camera, that is static on a tripod. Both cameras will probably be used 50/50 for the production, so I will want the cameras to be able to match looks wise, especially since the Osmo, has very different lenses compared to a DSLR.

    What do you think?

    Related Topics:

  2. #2
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I know next to nothing about the Osmo so I am not going to talk about it.

    As for the Glidecam, there is a reason that it is one of the most copied pieces of equipment in the market. Just ask Devin Graham if it is a piece of crap. He went from being a film school graduate to one of the most sought after filmmakers for commercial videos, and makes a heck of a living at it, all while shooting with a Glidecam. His notoriety with it even inspired Glidecam to come out with a Devin Graham edition, with the tweaks on it that he preferred it to have when it didn't.

    It is a good, if not pricey, piece of equipment. I have one of the knock-offs because I don't have that kind of money to spend on it.....or rather.....I can't bring myself to spend that much money on it. I am a Toolmaker. I know how things are made........I'll leave it at that.

    ....and yes, I've made my own balancer and I have a prototype for another.

    Anyway, yes, the camera issue is a concern. 2 different cameras like that are going to give you another thing to do in editing to get a consistent look. If you shoot everything with the same camera, and use it on a Glidecam-like stabilizer, your footage will all match.

    I hope that helps.

    Steve


  3. #3
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Oh cool, a Devin Graham edition! That's interesting.

    I'm just going by what one director I worked for told me, is that the glidecam will result in unusable footage (shrug). I looked at some comparisons between that and the Osmo. The Osmo certainly moves better than the glidecam. The glidecam drifts a bit while running with it, compared to the Osmo. I don't like the drift.

    However, the Osmo has a very different look, camera wise, and that will be more work to match up. The director told me that it's worth the extra work, but I don't know if it is, compared to accepting a little bit of drift when running.

    There is also the Gimbal Ronin and the Rhino steady. I don't really like the Rhino footage, as it does jerk a little I find when the operator tries to do circular motions more.

    I was told by the director to get a Ronin cause they are the best of the best he said. I tried the Ronin out, but I didn't like how it had to be disassembled and reassembled, each time from driving from location to location. Basically the Ronin is not fit for placing in a car, and driving it with all one piece, and it keeps having to be broken down into sections when going mobile from location to location during shoots.

    It takes too much time to have to keep reassembling it from place to place, and I need a stabilizer, that can stay all in one piece for an entire's days shoot. So I figured the glidecam or Osmo would probably be best.

    Last edited by ironpony; 09-08-2017 at 10:27 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If he says the footage shot on a Glidecam is unusable the problem is the operator.

    So many people use them on film shoots, including shoots with a budget. Check out Devon Graham's videos on Youtube. He is rich, and he did it with a Glidecam.

    If the camera drifts then it is not properly balanced. It takes some practice to get good at it, like anything else.


    Money is also an issue. You have to get the most for your money and what will work best within your budget. There may be something better, but if you can't afford it it doesn't matter.


    I transport my Glidecam knock-off assembled and set, ready to go.


    Steve


  5. #5
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. Is your glidecam knock off the Flycam, by any chance? Or is it homemade?


  6. #6
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It is one of the many on ebay from China. I compared a number of them, looking at videos on YouTube, to see which one had the best construction, consistency in the product, and results. It is but it is not a Flycam. I believe that one is made in India and it did not make the grade for me in my research. Mine is sold under the name CAME, but there are several different designs, and the one I bought may not even be available anymore.


    Steve


  7. #7
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. The Flycam looks the same but cheaper. But is it as good or does it have any disadvantages in comparison? Also, you say it's the operator. I'm probably going to have a DP operate it though, while I do other things such as sound or what not, so would the DP have to put in a lot of practice? If so, that is fine, as long as I can find a DP who is okay with it.

    Also, you say that it's the operator error if the contraption is drifting or shaking, right? When I watch this video, on the Glidecam vs. Rhino:



    The Rhino does shake and jerk a little during some of the movements. Not all but some. Is this a result of the operator or is the steadicam actually better than the Rhino?

    Last edited by ironpony; 09-08-2017 at 05:36 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Walter B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Rotterdam area, The Netherlands
    Posts
    367
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Osmo settings/specs are on the DJI website :p


  9. #9
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks, but I already looked and they do not put the shutter speed, and manual controls specifically.


  10. #10
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    OK, we were talking about the Glidecam and Glidecam knock-offs. Now you are talking about the Glidecam compared to another balancer with a very different design principle.

    Whereas the Glidecam has a wider balancing base, meaning the width of the horseshoe part of the handle that engages the bearing that goes around the vertical shaft, the Rhino basically has a pin-point balancing base with the small ball and socket joint. This makes the Rhino more sensitive to movement than the Glidecam.

    The first stabilizer I made was very similar to the design of the rhino. It worked amazing compared to hand held. It would drift easier than a Glidecam because it is balancing on such a small contact area of the ball in the ball and socket joint.

    Think of it as balancing on one foot, then balancing on just your toes on one foot.

    This is why the Glidecam is a more stable design. It holds the balance of the camera across the width of the axis of the bearing, and the horseshoe part of the handle that is connected to the bearing.

    Here's something else to remember about this video. This was the first time they touched these stabilizers. They did not have any practice. I am sure after a couple weeks of shooting they got much better.

    If ANYONE is going to use a stabilizer they need to play and practice with it. It is the only way to get real good with it.

    Think of it like getting a new fishing rod. You can buy the best one out there, but if you are casting into the trees with the rod you currently use, you will continue to cast into the trees with the new fishing rod. The rod is only as good as the person casting with it.

    Same thing with stabilizers. By design, they remove the subtle inputs into the camera from your hands by separating your hands from the camera and putting in apparatus that causes a "lost motion" condition. However, two people using the same stabilizer will have different results based on experience. There are ways to handle the stabilizer that enhance its ability to keep your motion from influencing the camera. The operator with more practice, and a better understanding of how the stabilizer performs as a result, will have the rock steady images.



    Steve


  11. #11
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    One last thing. The design of the Glidecam is essentially the same as a Steadicam. The arm and vest of of a genuine Steadicam is only to hold up the weight of the stabilizer, camera, and accessories, without imparting additional movement since the camera operator is now WEARING the camera. The arm is not stabilizing the camera, it is taking the weight of the stabilizer.

    The Glidecam is that same stabilizer, by design principle, as the Steadicam....without the articulating arm. What we use is lighter than Pro gear. My stabilizer came with the arm and vest. I rarely use them. Only while shooting all night on paranormal investigations did I wear it.


    Steve


  12. #12
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. So when it comes to the Rhino or the Glidecam, is one of them actually better then?

    Also my other main concern is not being able to pull focus while using them, and I'll probably have to shoot around f11-f16 to give the actors enough focus room.

    Which means I am going to either have to use a camera that can shoot at a high ISO and still look good, like the Sony A7s II or something like that. Or I will need to budget for some really bright lights, to open the aperture up to F11.

    For my last short film, I wanted the master shots to be shot in deep focus and the DP said that it can't happen. So I will need to find a DP that can do it as well as operator the glidecam that means.

    Last edited by ironpony; 09-09-2017 at 02:43 PM.

  13. #13
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    YouTube has hundreds of videos on stabilizers. Do your homework. The questions you are asking here would make one wonder how ANYONE ever makes a film. Again, you are looking at why things won't work rather than looking to understand how they do work. Millions of people are out there making films with stabilizers. Apparently, they work. Go learn how.


    Steve


  14. #14
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yeah that's true, I am trying to eliminate all the problems, and perhaps that is just taking too much effort, instead of getting the stabilizer and making the movie.


  15. #15
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Research a number of them, chose one as best you can, and then work with it. Practice balancing it. Shoot with it. Tweak the balance some more. Then shoot some more. Try walking up and over a picnic table to really challenge yourself. You still won't be perfect with it, but you will know infinitely more about it than just wondering about it. With time you will get real good with it. This is how everything goes.

    You can spend 3 years asking about something and be no better when you get it than you will be if you get it and practice a few weeks with it.


    Steve


  16. #16
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. However, I will probably have to do other duties such as audio, or something like that, and want to rely on a DP or someone to operate the stabilizer. So would the DP be willing to put in a much practice to use the glidecam? That's my problem.


  17. #17
    Junior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Demi 31's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    14
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I give the Osmo a low yes. I will however say that there is a big difference between the Osmo-Mobile, the original Osmo and the newer Osmo+. I think this as well could be an interesting comparison to make.


  18. #18
    Pro Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Aaron Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Flint, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I had the Osmo 4K camera. It is a good little cam and will get you good shots that others cant get in some cases. Let me say this, different tools work for different applications.. Here is some pros and cons off the top of my head. Go through them and see if this is something you can live with. I did get paid to grab some shots of a ghetto while driving by for a celebrity Music Vid and the Osmo was perfect for those shots. Different tools work for different applications.

    Pros:
    The tablet and smartphone serves as a great view finder as well
    You can adjust he picture profile, aperture, and resolution in the settings and through your tablet or smartphone.
    Stabilization
    Mountable - I had the car mount as well and made nice approach shots to the church for wedding vids.
    Media is affordable


    Cons:
    Bad moire on brick buildings, stripe suites, and so on.
    Not good in low light
    Not good directed into the light or sun.
    Battery life is not the greatest - I had 4 extra batteries and I would go through them for an all day session

    The glide cam will allow you to put different cameras on it and not just tied down to one. Something to think about.

    JCV GY-LS300 / Samsung NX1 / Z Cam E1 / Zhiyun Crane W/remote / Win 10 PC / Adobe 2017 CC Suite

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks, this helps a lot! I am going over the shots I want that involve camera movement and I want to be able to move the camera from a master shot, to an extreme close up on someone's face. Now since I cannot pull focus on a glidecam, is this possible with a glidecam, as long as I light the scene with bright enough lights to shoot at f-16 or deeper, so I can go from master to extreme close up, without having to pull focus?


  20. #20
    Pro Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Aaron Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Flint, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There is different ways of doing this. It can be done on a tripod with a zoom lens pulling focus. Can be done also with a camera that has great auto focus on a tripod. It can be done on a 4k camera where you have good solid focus and you can zoom a frame half way and in post editing control more of a zoom. The glide cam I feel would have more movement to the camera on a close up but maybe that is what you are looking for. The Osmo will do the same.

    Again using your tools to your advantage will be key. I'm a huge 4k fan because I can control the frame work in post. When you habe a camera that records high bit rates collecting a good amount of information helps in post editing. You can also get a slider and mount on tripod and use it as your close up approach in conjuction with your zoom. There are plenty ways to make this happen without bying a specific camera to do the job. Maybe you just need a few extra tools like a slider/dolly. Maybe even can do some DIY project to get the necessary tools needed.

    I just threw somethings out to open up your options as to the many ways it can be done. Only you know truly the look you are going for. I hope this helps.


  21. #21
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. I didn't want to get a slider cause I felt there is not enough range of movement in it, and it can only move three feet about, it seems. As for the zoom, no one I know has a constant aperture zoom lens, so the exposure changes during the zoom as a result. But I guess it depends on the DP I get and what camera and lenses he has as well. So far the only way I can zoom on a low price, is to get an adapter to put in between the lens and the camera. Cause that adapter prevents the lens from changing exposure while zooming.

    But this is dependent on the light source itself, and how it feeds the T stops in to the lens.


  22. #22
    Pro Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Aaron Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Flint, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Well, hopefully you have the option to put the camera in manual mode where you don't have to have an adapter. Just a thought. The slider would only work in conjunction with 4k as you explained your requirements earlier. I just wanted you to open up your options to what you can do to accomplish your shot without having to run out and spend $500 or so on a Osmo unless that is exactly what you wanted. It is just things to think about when purchasing gear for you movies.

    I want to say Congrats on your movie making career. Most people do not make it this far. So I applaud your perseverance and dedication to tell the story with imagery the way you see it in your mind. The trick is to capture what's in your mind media. That is the art. Congrats!!!


  23. #23
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    But even on manual mode on the camera, the lens still changes exposure while zooming. Basically say if I set the aperture to f8, and have it zoomed out, and then zoom all the way in, it will still read as f8. But you can still see the exposure go from bright, to dark, to bright again, as the lens zooms in. It has to readjust exposure while zooming and you can see the exposure readjustment, cause it cannot stay at f8 the entire time. It starts out as f8, then gets darker, then goes back to f8 after finished zooming.

    I was told that even though it's set to the same aperture throughout the zoom, the lens is not a constant aperture lens, so it therefore, cannot be constant, even though the camera is on the same aperture setting. But it seems that you can turn a non-constant aperture zoom lens, into one, but placing an adapter in front of it, and thus keeping the aperture constant throughout the zoom. However, this will only work, if the scene is lit in a way, in which the lens can absorb the same amount of light constantly, as it zooms. Or so I was told by a DP.

    Oh okay thanks! Are you congradulating me on the last short film, or something?

    As for shooting in 4K then zooming in, in post, in film school we were advised against that, cause 4K has become the new medium, that people all want now and even netflix is wanting 4k content now. So therefore, if I zoom, then the shot will no longer be 4k, if that's the new medium in demand though. What do you think?

    Last edited by ironpony; 09-13-2017 at 12:24 PM.

  24. #24
    Pro Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Aaron Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Flint, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    471
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I was congratulating you for getting this far in your film making career. Anyway, if your zoom lens is not constant then yes it will change based on the aperture rating of the lens. If you have a 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 at 50mm of the zoom you will get f/5.6. To keep it constant you go as far as the zoom that you need and set your aperture there and then add lighting as needed. It should not change on you in manual if you do this. Just one way to keep it constant. IF you use an adapter with the same lens it will still change based on the aperture rating.

    JCV GY-LS300 / Samsung NX1 / Z Cam E1 / Zhiyun Crane W/remote / Win 10 PC / Adobe 2017 CC Suite

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Okay thanks. However, I tried what you say while setting the aperture when it's zoomed in the most, and it still changes exposure while zooming back and forth. Perhaps this is a Canon thing, and it's not the case with other DSLR cameras?


  26. #26
    Senior Member   Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Osmo vs. Glidecam Which is better? Steve Olander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    705
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    If you have an ASP-C sensored Canon DSLR then Tokina makes some fixed aperture lenses.

    Again, you have to look into these things.


    Steve


  27. #27
    Senior Member
    ironpony started this thread.
      ironpony's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yeah I looked into it but the Tokina ones that are in my price range do not zoom far enough, from what I could tell. I could zoom in post if shooting 4k like suggested, but worried a post zoom will look unnatural, to what audiences are use to.


+ Add Reply

Tags for this Thread



Contributing Members

Follow us on

Twitter Facebook youtube Twitter